Weather

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Rain cancels Saturday at Jazz Fest

Posted By on Sat, Apr 30, 2016 at 7:50 PM

Jazz Festers wade through the Fairgrounds for a bite before leaving after bad weather and rough conditions at the festival canceled the remainder of the afternoon's performances.
  • Jazz Festers wade through the Fairgrounds for a bite before leaving after bad weather and rough conditions at the festival canceled the remainder of the afternoon's performances.
Stevie Wonder's Saturday morning soundcheck included Prince's "Purple Rain," seemingly setting up his headlining set at the 2016 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival for one of the biggest tributes to the late artist over the two festival weekends.

Instead, Wonder sang it with the crowd through a megaphone from the Acura Stage after announcing his 5 p.m. show had been canceled. So were all other stages for the rest of the day — including sets from Beck and Snoop Dogg and the second half of sets from Dr. John and Hurray for the Riff Raff, among others — after heavy downpours formed shin-deep pools and winds sent water onto stage equipment. Jazz Fest last shut down early during an anticipated but lightning-filled Wilco set in 2015.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , ,

Monday, April 4, 2016

Y@ Speak: endangered species

Posted By on Mon, Apr 4, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Dear Bird Lover Basketball Fan:

Our Pelicans need your help. One by one, these men are forced to wear suits and sit down instead of running for a few hours in their natural habitat: shiny, shiny wood in multimillion dollar state-of-the-art arenas. Please, think of the bird men.

Continue reading »

Tags: , ,

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Editorial: Help Louisianans affected by the March flooding

Posted By on Tue, Mar 15, 2016 at 11:52 AM

In this photo supplied by the U.S. National Guard, 2nd Lt. William Hall and Cpl. Kurt Humpreys of the 2nd Squadron, 108th Cavalry Regiment, conduct door to door searches in Pecan Estates in Bossier City, March 10, 2016. - U.S. NATIONAL GUARD PHOTO BY STAFF SGT. JERRY RUSHING
  • U.S. NATIONAL GUARD PHOTO BY STAFF SGT. JERRY RUSHING
  • In this photo supplied by the U.S. National Guard, 2nd Lt. William Hall and Cpl. Kurt Humpreys of the 2nd Squadron, 108th Cavalry Regiment, conduct door to door searches in Pecan Estates in Bossier City, March 10, 2016.

Predictions of record-setting rainfall in New Orleans two weeks ago never came to pass, but it was a very different story north and east of Lake Pontchartrain. Monroe reported 24 inches of rain, while Shreveport got 12 inches. And most of that drained into Louisiana and Mississippi waterways, especially the Abita, Bogue Falaya, Tchefuncte and Pearl rivers.

The Northshore saw historic flooding in 1983, but by all measures the flood of 2016 was worse. The Bogue Falaya crested at 20 feet (flood stage is 6 feet). In Mississippi, the Pearl reached just over 20 feet (flood stage: 14 feet). At least four people died as a result of the storm and the flood. Areas of northwestern St. Tammany Parish that never had seen floodwaters before were flooded out, and many of those affected don’t have flood insurance. The Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries had rescued 777 people (plus 120 dogs and six cats) in St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, Washington and more than a dozen other parishes as of March 14, when the waters were receding.

While metro New Orleans largely was spared, the cleanup effort for thousands of homes that flooded comes just two weeks after 10 tornados touched down in southeast Louisiana and southwest Mississippi. New Orleanians know how it feels to lose everything in a flood, and we know how it feels to know that others care. Here are ways you can help, along with resources for those who need them.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , ,

Sunday, November 1, 2015

Final day of the 2015 Voodoo Experience is canceled

Posted By on Sun, Nov 1, 2015 at 11:40 AM

The crowd endures the rain at the Le Plur stage on Oct. 31 at the 2015 Voodoo Music + Arts Experience. - ALEX WOODWARD
  • ALEX WOODWARD
  • The crowd endures the rain at the Le Plur stage on Oct. 31 at the 2015 Voodoo Music + Arts Experience.

Rain has overwhelmed City Park this Halloween weekend — and the ongoing rough weather has forced organizers of the 2015 Voodoo Music + Arts Experience to cancel the festival's final day, Sunday, Nov. 1. Here's the statement from the festival:
Due to dangerous weather conditions including forecasted persistent rain and flash flood warnings for Orleans Parish for Sunday, November 1, the final day of the 2015 Voodoo Music + Arts Experience has been canceled. Fan safety is the top priority for the producers of the festival and current conditions at City Park do not meet our standards for maintaining a safe experience.
Organizers will offer full refunds to Sunday's ticketholders, and three-day pass holders will receive one-third of the posted price at time of purchase. Information on refunds is available on the Voodoo website. Organizers told Gambit that despite the bad weather, turnout this weekend was strong, and they're looking forward to next year's event.

Tags: ,

Monday, October 26, 2015

Y@ Speak: runoff

Posted By on Mon, Oct 26, 2015 at 12:42 PM

Hey, did you vote? Based on the poll turnout numbers, probably not. You probably had a pretty good tweet ready, though, and hey, you've got another month to brew up some governor's race zingers. Here are a few. Also: The New Orleans Saints didn't lose and rain unfortunately won.

Continue reading »

Monday, June 1, 2015

Y@ Speak: #HurricanePrep

Posted By on Mon, Jun 1, 2015 at 1:15 PM

As we all begin stocking up one gallon of water per family member per day (this is a thing we all do, right? right?), we bless the rains down in Everywhere, talk about gentrification, and prepare for a summer full of Hurricane Katrina and federal flood retrospectives. Also this week: the unmasking of everyone's favorite turnt up governor @notBobbyJindal.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , ,

Monday, May 4, 2015

Y@ Speak: skywriters in flight, afternoon delight

Posted By on Mon, May 4, 2015 at 1:30 PM


A skywriter clogged everyone's Instagram feeds as if one person's sky was different from everyone else's, Jazz Fest concluded its second weekend with a small country of crowds, and hey, remember when it rained terrifyingly hard and a train fell off a bridge? Good times. Also in this week's Twitter roundup: libraries, New Orleans Saints news and a vandalized St. Roch Market.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sunday, February 15, 2015

Proteus, Orpheus to roll early on Lundi Gras; bad weather expected late Monday

Posted By on Sun, Feb 15, 2015 at 4:21 PM

2014's Fat Tuesday was a wet, miserable affair — and 2015's Lundi Gras night is shaping up to be the same if current forecasts prove true. - CREATIVE COMMONS/INFROGMATION
  • CREATIVE COMMONS/INFROGMATION
  • 2014's Fat Tuesday was a wet, miserable affair — and 2015's Lundi Gras night is shaping up to be the same if current forecasts prove true.

The CIty of New Orleans announced this afternoon that both the Krewe of Proteus and the Krewe of Orpheus are moving up the start times for their Lundi Gras parades in anticipation of bad weather later in the evening. Proteus now will roll at 4 p.m., with Orpheus following at 4:45 p.m.

UPDATE: The city has announced a slight route change; both parades will turn right at Canal Street from St. Charles Avenue, then continue their normal route.

The ceremonial arrivals of Rex and Zulu at Spanish Plaza haven't been altered — yet. But check tomorrow before heading to Spanish Plaza. No one wants a wet, miserable Lundi Gras like last year's wet, miserable Mardi Gras, and current forecasts for Monday night include 37-degree temperatures with a 90 percent chance of rain in metro New Orleans.

For the most recent news, check the City of New Orleans' Mardi Gras website.

The city's press release under the jump...

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, July 3, 2014

New websites show the scary effects rising sea levels will have on New Orleans

Posted By on Thu, Jul 3, 2014 at 2:20 PM

A projection of what New Orleans would look like if sea levels rose one meter
  • FROM #DROWNYOURTOWN
  • A projection of what New Orleans would look like if sea levels rose one meter

Via the Washington Post comes this scary image of what downtown New Orleans would possibly look like if global sea levels rose by a meter. As you can see, tailgating for Saints games will become an amphibious affair. The map was produced by the Tumblr site #DrownYourTown and you can check out what could potentially happen to cities like New York City, Washington D.C. and even inland metro areas like Pittsburgh.

Granted, the #DrownYourTown maps happen to forecast mostly worst-case scenarios for most cities. The New Orleans map is modeled on a one-meter rise in sea level, which according to the EPA won't happen until after the year 2050. But before you go dismissing these images as internet fear-mongering, remember that this is actually old news for Louisiana. As The Lens reported in February 2013, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted that Louisiana will see the "highest level of sea-level rise on the planet".

The entire article is worth a read if you want a quick, albeit sort of depressing, look at the future of Louisiana's coastline. But while disappearing wetlands has long been a concern to this state, severe weather over the past two decades has prompted other states to adopt more sophisticated coastline mapping technologies. Per the Post article:

After Hurricane Floyd practically leveled the [North Carolina] in 1999, the state legislature ponied up cash to become the first state in the nation mapped through a new process called lidar.

Lidar — which stands for Light Detection and Ranging — uses airborne lasers to examine the surface of the earth and produce uncommonly detailed and accurate elevation maps. The technology is so revolutionary, it has been credited with locating the legendary Lost City of the Monkey God in an otherwise impenetrable Central American rain forest.

North Carolina is not alone in trying to map out and plan for rising sea levels. In January 2013, Virginia commissioned a study on the potential dangers posed to the state by rising sea levels. In addition, the NOAA has its own interactive map that displays lidar measurements and helps people gauge property damage caused by rising sea levels, though it takes some patience to figure out. Climate Central's Surging Seas website has a simpler version with a clearer picture of what would happen to the New Orleans metro area.

Unfortunately, all of these maps have one thing in common: they show New Orleans being scarily susceptible to serious damage due to rising sea levels. Considering the type of flooding this city seas during heavy rains, it's enough to make you run for the hills (if we had any to run to, that is).

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Monday, February 24, 2014

Y@ Speak: Carnival Time Lord

Posted By on Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 1:45 PM

As Mardi Gras 2014 nears, let's look back at the first week of parades — and towed cars, electioneering, sci-fi nerd alerts and a French Quarter's eau de wet dog. Also: Kevin Hart eats chicken and Margaret Orr takes a selfie. Bonus: Dumpsters, Neutral Milk Hotel and gutterpunk advice.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Submit an event Jump to date

Recent Comments

© 2017 Gambit
Powered by Foundation