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STAGE My-O-My 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, May 5-7; through June 3 Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com The French Quarter's fabled burlesque heyday has obviously received more than its fair share of retrospective tribute. But there is another form of performance that deserves a nostalgic brush of appreciation, and it will finally receive its due. My-O-My , directed by Carl Walker, honors that venerable Lakefront club that featured some of the most popular drag queens in the nation. Walker, one of the city's most talented directors, has teamed up with Le Chat Noir (producing its first major production in six years) and assembled a stellar cast: recent Big Easy Entertainment Award winner Brian Peterson and Bob Edes and Paul Soileau, with Los Angeles comedian/singer Shawn Landry coming in for the performance, and Doug Parks making a special appearance. Beverly Trask provides the choreography, Larry Seiberth the musical direction and Patty Spinale the costumes. Tickets $25 for Thursday's opener through Mystick Krewe of Satyricon (call 525-4498); call Le Chat Noir for other performance tickets. -- David Lee Simmons MUSIC Amina Figarova 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. Thursday, May 5 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro, 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com Figarova is a virtuoso pianist who began to play at age 2 in her native Azerbaijan and went on to become one of the stars of the former Soviet Union's classical music program. After appearing at a 1989 recital in the Netherlands, she was invited to study at the Rotterdams Conservatory's jazz department. She excelled as a jazz pianist and continued her studies at Boston's Berklee College of Music before turning pro. She returns to New Orleans in support of a new album, Come Escape With Me (Munich), featuring a septet including her flautist husband Bart Platteau, Marcel Reys on trumpet and flugelhorn, Kurt van Herck on tenor saxophone and Tom Beek on alto and soprano saxophones. The vivid melodies of Figarova's compositions burst from her nimble piano work, a true hybrid of classical and jazz influences. Call club for cover. -- John Swenson EVENTS 28th Annual Bank One Zoo-to-Do 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday, May 6 Audubon Zoo, 6500 Magazine St., 861-6160; www.auduboninstitute.org Only in New Orleans do people have the audacity to party in celebration of bugs, but so be it; the annual Zoo-to-Do's theme is 'Fireflies and Black Ties' to herald the upcoming opening of the Audubon Insectarium. The children already had their day a few weeks ago with the Zoo-to-Do for kids, but now it's time for the adults to take over as Big Bad Voodoo Daddy will provide the entertainment at the gala fundraiser. Food will be provided by 150 area restaurants, while a raffle drawing will produce a 2006 Infiniti M35. (Only 1,000 raffle tickets, priced at $100, will be available.) Last year's event raised $1.1 million. Individual tickets $195 general public, $155 Audubon Nature Institute members; patron and sponsor ticket levels begin at $550. -- David Lee Simmons STAGE Riverdance 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, May 3-7, with 2 p.m. matinees Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, May 8 Saenger Theatre, 143 N. Rampart St., 524-2490; www.saengertheatre.com Elevate your Riverdance experience from open-mouth amazed gazing at TV commercials to the real thing. The global phenom returns to the Saenger Theatre for eight performances as part of the Broadway in New Orleans series. Composed by Bill Whelan, Riverdance celebrates Irish music, song and dance and gives examples of how the Celtic forms eventually influenced dance and song in other cultures (primarily Spanish flamenco and American tap). The music alone was great enough to earn Whelan the 1997 Grammy Award for 'Best Musical Show Album'; Riverdance -- The Album (Celtic Heartbeat/Universal Records) has sold more than 2 million copies worldwide. With a base in ancient Irish mythology, Riverdance starts with Act One set in a primitive world where dance and song emerge as a way for people to negotiate with nature. Evolving from that root theme, the show moves through more modern struggles of war, famine, slavery and the dislocation of Irish people. Riverdance also shows Irish immersion into new and diverse cultures. Tickets for Riverdance are available through the Saenger box office (569-1520) and all Ticketmaster outlets (522-5555; www.ticketmaster.com). Discounts for groups of 20 or more are available. -- Frank Etheridge MUSIC iPod Night 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 4 Shiloh, 4529 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1456 When 'Sweet Home Alabama' is playing on the jukebox, do you wish you could pull the cord and put on something less overplayed? In Chicago, New York City, London and now here, bars host an iPod Night, giving patrons a chance to play DJ, bringing in their own five-song playlists -- roughly 15 minutes -- on their iPods. Like an open-mic night, participants sign up and, when their turns come up, jack into the PA. Song choices are varied, with everything from participants' favorite songs to thematic mixes to homemade mash-ups. To fully appreciate the night, though, you need to bring your iPod mix because part of the fun is assembling the playlist. I spent two hours making two different playlists so I could choose a sound to fit the crowd and vibe. To Soel or to Malkmus? -- that was the question. Shiloh is generally a late-night scene, but iPod Night starts early so those who punch the clock can sleep longer than four hours. No cover. -- Reuben Brody EVENTS David Greely 6 p.m. Thursday, May 5 The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org As a part of the opening of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art's Spirit of Place: Art of Acadiana show, David Greely performs a tribute to Varise Connor, one of the most influential Cajun fiddle players. Greely, the fiddle player for Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys, will be performing with members of Connor's family to honor a musician who blended his Irish and Cajun roots in his music, and who counts Michael Doucet from BeauSoleil among his admirers. Ogden shows feature an interview segment, so Greely will also share a musician's perspective on Connor's innovations. Admission to the 'Spirit of Place' show is included. Cover $10 for non-members, free for members. -- Alex Rawls MUSIC 'Some Enchanted Evening' 7 p.m. Saturday, May 7 Heritage Park, 1701 Bayou Lane, Slidell, (985) 646-4375; www.slidell.la.us Slidell city officials are throwing out a come-one, come-all invitation for a festive picnic held under the trees and moonlight in serene Heritage Park. Now in its third year, the event -- dubbed 'Some Enchanted Evening' -- is highlighted by a concert by the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, but nicely embellished by the creativity of picnic-goers. The picnic's 2003 debut drew an impressive crowd of 5,000, and a tradition grew from attendees embellishing their picnics with everything from white-linen tablecloths to elaborate Asian themes. A contest recognizes the best efforts in four categories: Perfect Interlude (best romantic setting), Chromatic Overtures (most creative), Grand Staff (best presentation by an office or organization) and Minor Scales (ages 12-under). Winners receive four VIP tickets to the Air Force Band concert in Slidell May 30. In case of rain, the event will take place 7 p.m. Sunday, May 8. Free admission. -- Frank Etheridge MUSIC David Mooney Organ Trio 10:30 p.m. Sunday, May 8 The Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616; www.circlebar.net This gig starts a monthlong residency for this new trio of young jazzmen-about-town. Featuring Hot Club of New Orleans guitarist David Mooney, Quintology's organist Brian Coogan and drummer Simon Lott, the guitar-organ interplay superficially recalls Wes Montgomery and the late Jimmy Smith. Coogan's playing is not, however, as rooted in R&B and gospel as Smith's was, and Mooney's playing often feels more meditative than Montgomery's, as if he's contemplating notes while playing them. Closer attention reveals melody as the trio's subject for exploration, with Mooney particularly moving unpredictably from thought to thought. Powered by Lott's gentle swing, the compositions reclaim the organ from all the funk folk in town and turn it to more cerebral purposes. No cover. -- Alex Rawls
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