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Captive Audience 

Thousands flood the gates for the 35th annual Jazz & Heritage Festival.

The weather in New Orleans these past few weeks has been incredible. The sun has been shining brightly, the birds have been singing a little more loudly, and there has even been a distinctly cool breeze. Call it the air of anticipation.

It is an air that I, Count Basin™, your guide to the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, know all too well. For when Jazz Fest fills the air, there is nothing sweeter. For the last weekend of April and the first weekend of May, musicians and their fans from around the world descend on the Crescent City to experience Louisiana's rich culture and heritage. There is a musical spectrum that includes jazz and blues, Cajun and zydeco, rock and funk, Native American and reggae, and much more. There is the annual spotlight on a particular nation, this year shining on South Africa in celebration of its 10th anniversary of the end of apartheid.

But then there is also the food, the cooking demonstrations, the literature, the visual arts, the heritage displays ... Jazz Fest is so much more than first meets the eye and ear. That is why the Count has been preparing for it -- and you -- and is ready to present this comprehensive schedule of Jazz Fest's first weekend. Gambit Weekly's guide to the music is arranged chronologically so you'll always know when and where to be. Please enjoy, and always remember: Don't forget the sunscreen.

The name "Count Basin" and the Count Basin character are a registered service mark of Gambit Communications Inc. All rights reserved.

Friday, April 23

Parades

1 p.m., Economy Hall: Lady Rulers SAPC
2 p.m., Pilot Land Rollers and Old & Nu Style Fellas SAPCs with Olympia Brass Band
4 p.m., Zulu Walking Warriors and Original CTC SAPCs with Stooges Brass Band

Old Zion Baptist Church Choir
11 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel
This Central City church is the home of Southern Baptist Leadership Council in New Orleans. Its choir sings traditional and contemporary gospel, with an emphasis on beautiful harmonies.

Golden Arrows Mardi Gras Indians
11:15 a.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Mardi Gras Indian The Uptown-based Golden Arrows are led by Big Chief Estabon 'Peppy' Eugene, known for his old-style Indian suits, which use traditional materials like turkey feathers rather than plumes. Eugene also has a gospel-style voice that's gorgeous when he's speaking and even more so when he's singing. Much of what Eugene knows about being an Indian -- the history, the sewing and the role of a big chief -- came from his highly esteemed uncle, the late Robert 'Big Chief Robbe' Lee.

CRITIC'S PICK
Josephine Mills
11:15 a.m., Sprint Stage, R&B Mills exploded onto the scene with her superb debut CD, This Is Love, in 2003, though her fine musical lineage (father Rudy Mills is very active in the local community and fronts the Caribbean Funk Band) has been honing her talent for years. Outside the studio, her sultry R&B style complements a stunning stage presence, and musically the show is known for daring tangents.

Lady Charlotte Jazz Band
11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz This traditional New Orleans jazz band features pianist Olivia Cook, who over the course of her career has played with Danny Barker and many of the city's jazz legends.

Louisiana Purchase Bluegrass Band
11:15 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Bluegrass In 2004, we're beyond the Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial celebrations, but, thankfully, this year brings the Jazz Fest debut of the Louisiana Purchase Bluegrass Band's mix of traditional and contemporary bluegrass.

Quamon Fowler Sextet
11:15 a.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz Fort Worth, Texas, native Fowler is an acclaimed young tenor saxophonist who studied with Alvin Batiste at Southern University. In 2002, his composition, 'The Reinforcement,' was selected as one of the top three compositions in the first annual ASCAP Foundation Young Jazz Composer's Awards competition. In 2002 and 2003, Fowler participated in the prestigious Betty Carter's Jazz Ahead program at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Fowler has played with David 'Fathead' Newman, Wynton Marsalis, Nicholas Payton and others.

Pat 'Mother Blues' Cohen
11:25 a.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Cohen is a seasoned veteran of the Bourbon Street club scene. In a city shockingly devoid of many great blues options, Mother Blues looks to use the Jazz Fest stage to deliver, in trademark over-the-top fashion, her homage to authentic, down-home blues.

New Orleans Public Schools Modern Jazz Outreach Ensemble
11:30 a.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz This jazz ensemble of Uptown children led by Steven Foster has grown from its church roots to a community project.

Craig Adams & Higher Dimensions of Praise
11:45 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This 12-singer gospel ensemble led by Adams regularly performs with a backing band at gospel festivals.

SUBR Jazz Ensemble
11:45 a.m., Acura Stage, Contemporary Jazz This Jazz Fest staple, led by the great educator and clarinetist Alvin Batiste, gathers the best students in jazz studies at Southern University in Baton Rouge. Batiste teaches his students the entire range of jazz history, so you're likely to hear everything from Sidney Bechet to John Coltrane. Alumni from this band include Henry Butler, Herman Jackson, Branford Marsalis, Donald Harrison, Reginald Veal, Herlin Riley and Wes Anderson among others, so you'll hear tomorrow's jazz stars today.

Bamboula 2000
12:20 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Caribbean Bamboula 2000 is one of the best local world music ensembles. Led by community activist and percussionist Luther Grey, Bamboula 2000's music spans the wide spectrum of the African Diaspora.

Kid Simmons' Local International All-Stars
12:20 p.m., Economy Hall, Traditional Jazz Trumpeter John 'Kid' Simmons keeps it traditional with a tight band that includes Les Muscutt on banjo, Bob Broockman on piano, Frank Oxley on drums, Gerald Adams on contrabass and Daniel Farrow on saxophone. Their most recent album, Over in the Gloryland, was recorded live at the Louisiana Music Factory and showcases band specialties like the tangofied 'St. Louis Blues,' 'Panama,' 'Up the Lazy River' and 'Yes Sir That's My Baby.'

Los Vecinos
12:20 p.m., Sprint Stage, Latin The musicians in this downtown New Orleans group play together in many combinations. This aggregation, led by bassist Andy Wolf, takes the music of Cuba and lets that island's clave rhythm groove all afternoon long. Some of these musicians have been playing together so long they can complete each other's thoughts.

Alvin Batiste & the Jazzstronauts
12:25 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Tent, Contemporary Jazz Space will be the place for this challenging avant-garde jazz unit led by virtuoso New Orleans clarinetist Alvin Batiste. Though his music is abstract, Batiste is always rooted in a soulful, spiritual style, as befits a veteran who worked with Ray Charles and whose first paying gig was with Guitar Slim. Batiste, a great educator who headed the Southern University jazz program since its inception in 1969, counts Branford Marsalis, Henry Butler and Donald Harrison among his pupils.

Lesa Cormier, August Broussard & the Sundown Playboys
12:25 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Cajun Billed as the 'second-oldest performing Cajun band in Louisiana,' the Sundown Playboys feature Cormier, a singing drummer who took over the band when his father, Lionel Cormier, died of a heart attack onstage in 1971. In 2000, accordionist August Broussard completed the Playboys' current lineup. In 1972, the Playboys cut a 45 titled 'The Saturday Night Special' for the Beatles' Apple Records.

Crescent City Sound Chorus of Sweet Adelines International
12:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This all-female chorus is the New Orleans chapter of the Sweet Adelines, a worldwide organization of women singing barbershop harmonies.

Hazel & the Delta Ramblers
12:35 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Bluegrass A longtime Jazz Fest favorite, mandolinist Hazel Schlueter is New Orleans' torch carrier for bluegrass and old-timey string music. With her band, the Delta Ramblers, she plays for local festivals and dances when not on tour. She also starts Sundays right for listeners of WWOZ (90.7 FM), with her long-running morning program of new and historic recordings.

Jeremy Lyons & the Deltabilly Boys
12:35 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Rockabilly Bluegrass, blues, rockabilly and old-timey music are distilled into a heady brew by this affable guitarist/vocalist and his band, the Deltabilly Boys. Lyons came from the bluegrass hotbed of Ithaca, N.Y., to New Orleans in 1992. He played his National guitar on the streets of the French Quarter, performing acoustic blues, swing and classic country. After five years, Lyons quit the street gig and recruited veteran drummer Paul Santopadre and fellow busker Greg Schatz (bass and accordion) into his trio. Their latest album is Live at the Dragon's Den.

Theresa Andersson
12:55 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock/Pop Still a work in progress, this talented violinist and vocalist appears to be reaching for a new identity on her recent release, Shine (Basin Street). Alternating between the rootsy, Raitt-inspired soul of her post-Anders Osborne period and some kind of Sheryl Crowe/Liz Phair mid-life pop-star turn, Shine shows Andersson is becoming more self-aware as an artist. After last year's ensemble, a blue bikini and body paint, fans certainly will be intrigued by Andersson's fashion choices this time. (See CD reviews in this issue.)

Proclaimers of Christ
1:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This small ensemble of both adults and children sings traditional gospel.

Bust!
1:30 p.m., Sprint Stage, Funk In 2003, saxophonist and All That alumnus Rebecca Barry recorded New Hope with Bust!, her funk band. The album's lineup included a who's-who of the Frenchmen Street music scene, including Kevin O'Day on drums and Dave Stover on bass.

Doc Paulin Brass Band
1:30 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Trumpeter and singer Ernest 'Doc' Paulin, who's nearing his 100th birthday, comes from a musical Creole family and learned to play from his uncle, trombonist Edgar Peters. His career as a bandleader now spans eight decades, and, at this point, he could have his hands full just leading his family. More than half of his 13 kids are continuing the tradition, including trombonists Dwayne and Scott, trumpeter Phillip, bass drummer Aaron, clarinetist Ricky, and saxophonist Roderick, who started playing with his dad's group when he was only 9.

Keith Claiborne
1:30 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, R&B New Orleanian Claiborne sings contemporary R&B. His latest CD is titled It Takes Two.

CRITIC'S PICK
Savoy Family Cajun Band

1:35 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Cajun With singer/guitarist (and author and producer) Ann and renowned accordionist and accordion builder Marc, the Savoys of Eunice make quite a musical family. Last year's Arhoolie release, The Savoy Family Album: Cajun Music, also featured family members Wilson and Sarah Savoy, along with fiddling eldest son, Joel, who also performs with the Red Stick Ramblers (which takes over this stage at 4:15 p.m.). Expect a set of transcendent trad Cajun.

Troy 'Trombone Shorty' Andrews
1:35 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz He's now played at Lincoln Center in New York and on stages in the Middle East, Europe and Africa. For good reason -- Troy Andrews has got high notes, slurs, pretty phrasing, circular breathing and a technique that belies the fact that he's still in high school. These days, you could say that he's outgrown his nickname -- he's often the tallest member of the band and the horn he's usually blowing is the trumpet.

Corey Harris
1:50 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Blues guitarist and former New Orleans resident Corey Harris was so inspired by his work on the 'Feel Like Going Home' episode of Martin Scorsese's The Blues: A Musical Journey series that he returned to Mali for more artistic inspiration. The result, From Mississippi to Mali (Rounder), once again establishes Harris' place among contemporary blues musicians such as Keb' Mo' and Alvin Youngblood Hart. The Count is more than pleased to welcome Harris back to the Crescent City. (Featured in this issue.)

CRITIC'S PICK
John Fohl
1:50 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Blues This one-time Cherry Poppin' Daddy stays busy, either on the road playing guitar in Dr. John's band or as part of Joe Krown's Organ Combo. His solo sets show his facility for acoustic blues. On his second album, 2002's Time Ain't Waitin', he successfully adapts James Booker's version of 'Sunny Side of the Street' for one acoustic guitar.

Dynamic Smooth Family
2 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This Slidell-based ensemble sings traditional gospel favorites, backed by a full band.

Jones Benally Family
2 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American The Jones Benally family comes from the Black Mesa area in Arizona. They are Din&233; (Navajo) people whose patriarch, Jones Benally, is a traditional medicine man and champion hoop dancer. Three of his children -- Jeneda, Clayson and Clover -- dance and sing traditional music with dad. Clayson, Jeneda and their brother Klee also have a punk-rock band that plays political songs like 'Mean Things Happenin' In This World,' 'Corn Song' and 'Woody Guthrie,' music set to unpublished Guthrie poems.

Buckwheat Zydeco
2:25 p.m., Acura Stage, Zydeco The James Brown of Zydeco, Buckwheat Zydeco leads his version of a soul/funk revue. By now, he is a national institution, and anyone who worries about him 'keeping it real' misses the point. He was an entertainer and a bandleader before he joined Clifton Chenier's Red Hot Louisiana Band, and that's what he is today.

Furius Stiles and Bionik Brown
2:45 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Hip Hop This showcase of New Orleans rap features Furius Stiles, a member of Donald Harrison Jr.'s Congo Nation on his New Sounds of Mardi Gras, Vol. 2. Brown, a gifted lyricist, emerged from Mental Metropolis to record 2001's The Darkness and the Light.

CRITIC'S PICK
Lionel Ferbos & the Palm Court Jazz Band

2:45 p.m., Economy Hall, Traditional Jazz Venerable trumpeter Lionel Ferbos is a Jazz Fest regular whose life parallels the history of New Orleans traditional jazz. Ferbos knew Louis Armstrong personally and plays the music with the warmth and sincerity of one who's seen it all. The resilient Ferbos still holds his regular Saturday night gig at the Palm Court Jazz Cafe and has a series of records available on the GBH label. Last year Ferbos was honored with the Music Heritage Award at the Big Easy Entertainment Awards.

People of Praise Community Choir
2:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel The 38-member People of Praise choir is based at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in St. Rose and directed by Gilliam Pierre III, who started the group last fall by recruiting singers from all around that area -- St. Rose, Luling, Boutte -- and then adding youngster musicians, most from Hahnville High School in Boutte.

Jon Cleary & the Absolute Monster Gentlemen
2:50 p.m., Sprint Stage, Funk /R&B He can channel New Orleans influences like Professor Longhair and the Meters with the greatest of ease, but Jon Cleary is so much more. Bonnie Raitt's go-to keyboardist is also a '70s soul man, a Caribbean interpreter and an improving songwriter. With his back-up band, the Absolute Monster Gentlemen (guitarist Derwin 'Big D' Perkins, bassist Cornell Williams and drummer Mac Carto), Cleary arguably lays down the funkiest grooves in the city. He's also sporting a new CD: Pin Your Spin (Basin Street). (See CD reviews in this issue.)

Lil' Brian & the Zydeco Travelers
2:50 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Zydeco On CDs such as Funky Nation, Lil' Brian set himself apart as a skilled accordionist not afraid to mix up zydeco, hip-hop and whatever else strikes his fancy. A longtime fan of Buckwheat Zydeco (another zydeco musician with an eclectic approach), Lil' Brian enlisted the help of Buckwheat himself, who has guided Lil' Brian and co-produced Funky Nation. In fact, take a look at Lil' Brian's right bicep -- that's Buckwheat's accordion inked under the skin.

The Woodshed: Terence Higgins vs. Stanton Moore
2:50 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Funk/Jazz Dirty Dozen Band drummer Higgins and Galactic drummer Moore will be bringing parts of their bands -- and guests -- with them. They'll be playing together and separately as well as working out on a tune by unsung New Orleans drum hero James Black. Jazzy funk and funky jazz will get the Jazz Tent crowd boogieing in the aisles. (Featured in this issue.)

Jim McCormick & the Full Band
3:05 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Country McCormick splits time between New Orleans and Nashville, where his song, 'Time Well Spent,' was recently cut by Blue County. His own shows rock more than is seemly on Music Row though, with a looseness and spirit reminiscent of the Band. His new album, You Can't Drown Your Sorrow, shows the band in top form. (See CD reviews in this issue.)

CRITIC'S PICK
Crocodile Gumboot Dancers

3:05 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, South African Like many rural South African traditions, the custom of dancing with ankle percussion was transformed in the migrant mineworkers' camps and the reservation-like townships. Wearing the standard 'gumboot' footwear of the gold miners, but adorned with urban versions of percussive materials such as bottle tops, the Crocodile Gumboot Dancers perform a unique set of dances and songs that represents a blending of the many cultures that worked and relaxed together in the mining camps.

John Lee & the Heralds of Christ
3:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This long-running gospel quartet is known for its reverent versions of traditional gospel favorites.

CRITIC'S PICK
Emmylou Harris featuring Buddy Miller

3:55 p.m., Acura Stage, Country/Folk Emmylou Harris sees no end in sight after having spent three decades now out from the shadow of Gram Parsons (though the Count still loves her executive-produced Parsons tribute, 1999's Return of the Grievous Angel). Coming off a Grammy for her Nonesuch Records debut, 2000's Red Dirt Girl, Harris last fall released Stumble Into Grace before reissuing five of her early works this year. Here she performs with guitarist and co-producer Buddy Miller. (See CD reviews in this issue.)

Olu Dara
4:05 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues/Jazz Vocalist, guitarist and cornet player Dara's music is an amalgam of jazz, blues and world music sources. A staple of the 1970s loft jazz scene in New York City, Dara also played with Art Blakey, David Murray, Sam Rivers, Taj Mahal and Julius Hemphill before finally recording his own album, 1998's In the World: From Natchez to New York and followed that up with 2001's Neighborhood (Altantic). He appeared at the 1999 Jazz Fest. (Featured in this issue.)

Poncho Sanchez Latin Jazz Band
4:10 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Latin Pancho Sanchez is among the greatest living conga players, the protege of conga master Mongo Santamaria and a key member of Tito Puente and Cal Tjader's bands. Last year's release, Out of Sight, featured guest appearances from Ray Charles, Sam Moore, Billy Preston and Pee Wee Ellis. His scorching Afro-Cuban group will light up the Fair Grounds.

Wendell Brunious
4:10 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Brunious, who leads the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, is primarily a traditional New Orleans jazz player, but the trumpet/flugelhorn mainstay handles a wide range of material from swing to be-bop and can fashion a set to suit the taste of most audiences. He even sings a little bit. Look for his band, the New Orleans Roof Jazzmen, to concentrate on material from the 2003 GBH release, Mama Don't Allow, including the title track, 'Buddy Bolden's Blues' and 'Creole Love Call.'

Jean Knight with the Knight's of Rhythm
4:15 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, R&B New Orleans native Jean Knight made a series of minor 1960s recordings with producer Huey P. Meaux, but hit it big with the Wardell Quezerque production of 'Mr. Big Stuff' in 1971. The tune became a soul music classic, reaching No. 2 on the Billboard pop charts. Knight went on to record the follow-up singles 'You Think You're Hot Stuff' and 'Carry On,' then re-emerged with 'You Got the Papers (But I Got the Man)' in 1981 and 'My Toot Toot' in 1985.

Red Stick Ramblers
4:15 p.m. Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Swing The world's only purveyors of 'authentic Cajun gypsy swing,' the Red Stick Ramblers are sort of a Louisiana version of the old Squirrel Nut Zippers, building a young audience with their hot versions of tunes and styles associated with the likes of Dennis McGee, Django Reinhardt and Bob Wills. The band's original 'Main Street Blues' was a featured cut on the compilation Merlefest Live! The Best of 2003.

The Trio: Johnny Vidacovich, George Porter Jr., June Yamagishi
4:15 p.m., Sprint Stage, Funk/Jazz These Maple Leaf regulars have been experimenting with various trio formats during a series of recent jam sessions and cutting sessions. Individually, they are each among the city's top musicians and hail from legendary groups -- drummer Vidacovich with Astral Project, bassist Porter with the Meters, and guitarist Yamagishi with Papa Grows Funk and the Wild Magnolias.

Julio & Cesar
4:25 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Latin These Latin brothers are skilled in the various styles of Latin guitar music, particularly Mariachi.

CRITIC'S PICKS
Lee Williams & the Spiritual QC's

4:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This quartet known for its harmonies won a Stellar Gospel Music Award in 2000 for its traditional gospel album, Good Time.

Jones Benally Family
5:15 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American The Jones Benally family comes from the Black Mesa area in Arizona. They are Din&233; (Navajo) people whose patriarch, Jones Benally, is a traditional medicine man and champion hoop dancer. Three of his children -- Jeneda, Clayson and Clover -- dance and sing traditional music with dad. Clayson, Jeneda and their brother Klee also have a punk-rock band that plays political songs like 'Mean Things Happenin' In This World,' 'Corn Song' and 'Woody Guthrie,' music set to unpublished Guthrie poems.

Bonnie Raitt
5:35 p.m., Acura Stage, Blues/Folk The redhead who sings the blues (and the folk, and the R&B, and the country &138;) is back again for what seems like her biannual appearance. Raitt, with a superb backing band that includes New Orleans' own Jon Cleary on keyboards, still keeps going on strong with a career that has seen its commercial peaks with some valleys. Her excellent 2002 release, Silver Lining, features two Cleary compositions ('Fool's Game,' 'Monkey Business').

CRITIC'S PICK
Banu Gibson & New Orleans Hot Jazz

5:40 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz A perennial Fest favorite, vocalist Gibson uses her strong but smooth voice to swing the pre-World War II traditional-jazz styles of the 1920s, &140;30s and &140;40s. Steeped in the classics by artists such as Annette Hanshaw, Gibson and the band stay busy with steady album releases (including 2002's stellar Steppin' Out) and globetrotting tour schedule.

Galactic
5:45 p.m., Sprint Stage, Funk We're grateful that New Orleans' entry into the jam-band sweepstakes can honor its Meters-inspired roots while also forging ahead with its own identity. Galactic proved that and more with last fall's bold release, Ruckus (Sanctuary), produced by in-demand producer Dan the Automator (Cornershop, Eels, Dr. Octagon). When they're focused, these guys present some of the most proficient music in town thanks to stellar playing particularly from saxophonist Ben Ellman, drummer Stanton Moore and guitarist Jeffrey Raines.

Keith Frank & the Soileau Zydeco Band
5:45 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Zydeco Year after year, Keith Frank is unstoppable. With his steady double-kicking zydeco beat firmly in place, he brings a playful theatricality to his shows, along with tunes that vary wildly between more-or-less traditional zydeco, snappy R&B, and goofy sing-song TV jingles. Throughout it all, he expertly keeps the dance floor (or festival field) packed. Among top zydeco acts in rural Louisiana, Frank remains the act to beat.

Selaelo Selota of South Africa
5:45 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Contemporary Jazz This gold-miner-turned-musician got his start in the days of apartheid when he moved to Johannesburg and was captivated by the sounds of jazz he heard everywhere. His own dynamic, electric guitar-driven jazz is influenced by the township sounds he heard and as a student in the College of Music at the University of Johannesburg. Today he is the College's Professor of Guitar, a recording artist, winner of numerous jazz music awards and a regular live performer on the Johannesburg jazz scene.

Donald Harrison
5:50 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz New Orleans saxophonist Donald Harrison combines many influences into a style he calls Nouveau Swing. His playing encompasses jazz, rhythm and blues, hip-hop and Mardi Gras Indian music. Onstage, all of this comes together for a high-energy, good-natured and very fun performance.

Henry Butler
5:50 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues One of New Orleans' most talented pianists, Henry Butler can go from intricate James Booker-like patterns to gut-bucket Professor Longhair riffs to jazz solos that make everyone present frozen in awe. His new CD, Homeland, tames him a bit, but live and in person there is no pianist better. (See CD reviews in this issue.)

Jimmy 'Bean' Ballero & the Renegade Band
5:50 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, R&B Veteran guitarist Ballero's R&B comes soaked in many flavors of New Orleans music, with stints playing alongside greats such as the Neville Brothers, Irma Thomas, Dr. John and national stars such as Bo Diddley and Taj Mahal. Ballero first played Jazz Fest in 1986.

Rosalie Washington, 'Lady Tambourine'
5:50 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel Fresh off an appearance in the movie The Fighting Temptations with Cuba Gooding Jr. and Beyonc&233;, this New Orleans tambourine legend is a regular performer of passionate, traditional gospel at the Gospel Tent.

Saturday, April 24

Parades:

Noon, Devastation, Valley of Silent Men and Original Step-n-Style SAPCs with Paulin Brothers Brass Band
1 p.m., Geronimo and Yellow Jackets Mardi Gras Indians
2 p.m., Lady Rollers, Undefeated Divas and Men Rollers SAPCs with Mahogany Brass Band
3 p.m., Trouble Nation, Red, White & Blue and Young Hunters Mardi Gras Indians
4 p.m., Money Wasters, Big Nine Steppers and Nandi Exclusive SAPCs with the Thunderstorm Brass Band
4:15 p.m., in Economy Hall: Jetsetter Ladies Social Aid & Pleasure Club


CRITIC'S PICK
The Crown Seekers

11 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This quartet from Marrero sings traditional gospel.

Chris Lacinak 'Boom'
11:15 a.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz Lacinak studied drums with James Black and Charles Blancq as a teenager, then as a young man alternated between jazz dates and gigs with New Orleans pop band, Tribe Nunzio. He's back in New Orleans after 10 years in New York City, and his new CD, Boom, features local such mainstays as David Torkanowsky, James Singleton and Michael Ray.

Hazard County Girls
11:15 a.m., Sprint Stage, Punk Rock Last year's Never No More release showed this all-female New Orleans rock band's roots in punk and heavy rock. While there's a little Black Sabbath in band members' backgrounds, there's more Nirvana and Hole, though (gratefully) without the melodrama. A welcome debut appearance by a band sure to wake up the Fair Grounds.

Mark Braud
11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Mark Braud, a 31-year-old trumpeter, is the grandson of the legendary trumpeter John 'Picket' Brunious Sr. and nephew of trumpeters Wendell Brunious and John Brunious. Though he's in Harry Connick Jr.'s band and has played with Eddie Bo and Henry Butler, Braud also plays at the Palm Court and Preservation Hall and is best known for his lively take on traditional New Orleans jazz, stretching out on chestnuts such as 'Bill Bailey,' 'Winin' Boy Blues' and 'Way Down Yonder In New Orleans.'

Little Freddie King Blues Band
11:20 a.m., Popeye's Blues Tent Originally from McComb, Miss., Little Freddie King developed his style of electric country blues playing around the Mississippi Delta with his father. His debut album for Fat Possum Records is due out in June. (Featured in this issue.)

SUNO Jazz Ensemble
11:30 a.m., Acura Stage, Contemporary Jazz, Blues The SUNO jazz ensemble consists of the best musicians attending classes at the Southern University at New Orleans. Some of the students you hear may be the stars of tomorrow, so catch them before they become household names.

Caledonian Society Scottish Dancers, Pipes & Drums of New Orleans
11:30 a.m., Lagniappe Stage, Folk Three different ensembles share the stage to deliver music and dance that are the forerunners of American square dance. From parading bagpipers and drummers to fiddle- and accordion-animated Scottish country dancers to the individual fancy footwork of the Highland dancers, the pride of Scottish culture will enliven the Fair Grounds.

Willie Metcalf & the Academy of Black Arts
11:35 a.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Contemporary Jazz Though Metcalf might be recognized by audiences for his role in Subway commercials, he arrives at Jazz Fest as a modern jazz pianist and music educator. He leads the Academy of Black Arts, a mix of professional and student musicians, which recently released It Looks Like a Winner. Metcalf's talents were discovered early, and since his days as a child prodigy he's performed with the likes of Thad Jones, Big Maybelle and Sonny Stitt.

Young Cheyenne Mardi Gras Indians
11:35 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Mardi Gras Indian The Young Cheyenne come out of the Eighth Ward, led by Big Chief Thomas Bo Dean III, a third-generation Indian who started masking when he was 4. When he was in his mid-20s, paternal grandfather Ferdinand Bigard handed over the Cheyenne to Dean, who re-named it the Young Cheyenne to emphasize that he was then the youngest chief in the city. Dean's twin sons, Tony and Thomas IV, have also embraced the tradition. Try to get an up-close look at his suit, which typically has told a compelling story -- about the twins' birth, his life, and the Indian tradition he's learned.

The Gospel Inspirations of Boutte
11:45 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This Boutte-based gospel band started in 1979 when many of its members were in their 20s. This contemporary gospel group -- five singers and a band -- credits fellow Boutte native, Gospel Tent organizer and Zion Harmonizer Sherman Washington for its start. Listen for their single, 'Yes, He's Coming Again,' the title song on their album.

Germaine Bazzle
12:15 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz A diva since decades before the term became clich&233; (and fitting the description in the truest sense of the word), Bazzle reigns as queen of female jazz vocalists in New Orleans. Also a music educator, Bazzle's strong voice and lifting spirit are the hallmarks of her electric performances.

Larry Garner
12:20 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Baton Rouge blues guitarist Larry Garner got his start playing at Tabby's Blues Box in the 1970s alongside fellow Baton Rouge bluesmen Silas Hogan, Whispering Smith, Arthur Kelly and Raful Neal. Garner is a prolific writer who does very few covers. Look for him to play the classics 'The Preacher Man Stole My Woman' and 'Keep Four Cars Running' from his acclaimed Verve/Gitanes release You Need to Live a Little as well as material from his most recent release, Embarrassment to the Blues.

Los Calientes
12:20 p.m., Sprint Stage, Latin Los Calientes, led by Jose Vázquez-Cofresi on congas and Julian Silva on timbales, have coined a progressive salsa sound that uses traditional clave rhythms in service of Spanish-language pop tunes with horn arrangements influenced by such atypical sources as Chicago and Maynard Ferguson. This hybrid style has proved to be extremely popular with salsa dancers across the country. Highlights of their recent debut album, Dale Rumbero, include 'Trozo de Papel' and 'Hoy Sufro.'

Linnzi Zaorski & Delta Royale
12:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Linnzi Zaorski's sexy, sultry vocals and cute, charming demeanor are vital catalysts to her expert channeling of pioneering jazz femmes such as Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald. Now a veteran of the Frenchmen Street music scene, Zaorski leads a tight ensemble and brings a funky vibe to beloved classics, an essence evident on her self-titled, 2003 debut album.

Greater King David Mass Choir
12:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent This Baton Rouge choir makes a big, beautiful sound singing contemporary gospel with more than 100 voices backed by a full band.

CRITIC'S PICK
Balfa Toujours

12:45 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Cajun It's well worth getting to this stage early to catch the lovely prairie Cajun stylings of Balfa Toujours. Bandleader Christine Balfa's father is the late Dewey Balfa, and as the name indicates, Balfa Toujours is dedicated to keeping his Cajun French language, twin-fiddle sound alive. Balfa and her husband, traditional music hero Dirk Powell (recently featured on the Cold Mountain soundtrack), have also launched the Dewey Balfa Cajun and Creole Heritage Week to help train the next generation of musicians.

Ivan Neville's Dumpstaphunk
12:45 p.m., Acura Stage, Funk Dumpstaphunk performed one of the stand-out sets last year, which is no surprise for someone with the 'Neville' name. Neville has been playing with the Neville Brothers, co-producing their upcoming album. His own band includes the cream of New Orleans' funk crop with Ian Neville sharing guitar duties with June Yamagishi.

NOCCA Jazz Ensemble
12:45 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz Start off the day right by listening to some of the brightest young jazz talents in town show off what they've learned at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts.

Batiste Brothers
12:50 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Funk One New Orleans' funkiest families, the Batiste Brothers feature Russell Batiste Jr., drummer for both the funky Meters and Papa Grows Funk.

New Orleans Spiritualettes
1:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel Started in 1956, this all-female choir sings primarily traditional gospel.

Derek Miller
1:20 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Blues Canadian rocker Derek Miller's songwriting prowess is the key to his studio debut CD, Music Is the Message, but his live shows turn on the power of his hard-rocking trio. They like their blues mixed in with some rock crunch north of the 49th parallel, and Miller fills the power trio guitarist frontman role with gusto. Check out 'War Shack,' 'Lovesick Blues #49,' 'Jaded Are My Wings' and 'The End of the World.'

Doug Wamble
1:25 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz Hailing from Tennessee, guitarist Doug Wamble has been making a name for himself in New York, playing with Cassandra Wilson and Steve Bernstein. Recently he has appeared on Branford Marsalis' Romare Bearden Revisited and his first album under his own name, Country Libations. Wamble can run the gamut from jazz to swing to blues.

Snooks Eaglin
1:35 p.m., Sprint Stage, Blues One of the most distinct blues guitarists of his generation, Snooks Eaglin is a human jukebox who can and will play anything from classic New Orleans rhythm and blues to classic rock. He's a unique force in New Orleans and one of the most beloved musicians in town, partly due to his willingness to gig with several different artists.

Alvin Youngblood Hart
1:40 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Though no stranger to local clubs such as Tipitina's and radio stations such as WWOZ, bluesman Hart gave notice of his sophisticated art and rising-star status as a singer, songwriter and guitarist with his Grammy-nominated 2002 album, Down in the Alley.

CRITIC'S PICK
Don Vappie & the Creole Jazz Serenaders

1:40 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Expect witty repartee and outstanding playing from banjoist-guitarist Don Vappie, who comes from a musical family that includes his great uncle, Storyville-era bassist and original Preservation Hall player 'Papa' John Joseph. Vappie is well-known among locals due time spent on air at WWOZ and years of teaching in the University of New Orleans' jazz program.

Jones Benally Family
2 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American The Jones Benally family comes from the Black Mesa area in Arizona. They are Din&233; (Navajo) people whose patriarch, Jones Benally, is a traditional medicine man and champion hoop dancer. Three of his children -- Jeneda, Clayson and Clover -- dance and sing traditional music with dad. Clayson, Jeneda and their brother Klee also have a punk-rock band that plays political songs like 'Mean Things Happenin' In This World,' 'Corn Song' and 'Woody Guthrie,' music set to unpublished Guthrie poems.

Shades of Praise
2 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This choir has attracted attention around the country with its inter-faith message and interracial membership. (See feature in this issue.)

Crocodile Gumboot Dancers
2:05 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, South African Like many rural South African traditions, the custom of dancing with ankle percussion was transformed in the migrant mineworkers camps and the reservation-like townships. Wearing the standard 'gumboot' footwear of the gold miners, but adorned with urban versions of percussive materials like bottle tops, the Crocodile Gumboot Dancers perform a unique set of dances and songs that represents a blending of the many cultures that worked and socialized together in the mining camps.

Friends of Jabu
2:05 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Funk/Jazz The funky, danceable jazz of Friends of Jabu has been a favorite of the local club scene since the band was formed by bassist Jimmy Ives as a studio collaboration, releasing First Offering in 2002. The 11-piece group plays a unique blend of jazz that incorporates elements of R&B and reggae.

Javier & Elegant Gypsy
2:05 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Latin Javier Tobar is a guitarist and vocalist with an eclectic sound based on but not limited to gypsy music. His album Elegant Gypsy featured Roberto Moreira on keyboards, Pepe Colome on guitar, Humberto 'Pupie' Memez on percussion, Hector Gallardo on timbales, Mike Skinkus on percussion and Andy Wolf on bass.

Leo Nocentelli
2:15 p.m., Acura Stage, Funk/Jazz The original guitarist for the Meters invented a subgenre of rhythm/lead funk guitar that has been copied but never copped. Over the years Nocentelli has opened up to a more jam-friendly style that is closer to improvised jazz and rock than the tightly wound funk he played with the Meters. But when he launches into his trademark tunes -- 'Cissy Strut,' 'Look A Py Py,' 'Same Ol' Thing,' 'The World is a Little Bit Under the Weather' -- the dancers always move with the groove.

CRITIC'S PICK
Astral Project

2:40 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz Is it too early to call them legendary? The embodiment of modern jazz in New Orleans, Astral Project combines the talents of saxophonist Tony Dagradi, guitarist Steve Masakowski, Zen bassist James Singleton and drummer Johnny Vidacovich to merge a smart, funky blend of jazz with steady reverb of local groove. Their latest album, Big Shot, is another addition to their impressive canon and showed a wholly new sound after the departure of pianist David Torkanowsky.

Rocks of Harmony
2:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This New Orleans quartet sings traditional gospel with dignity and class.

Charles Jackson & the Jackson Travelers
2:50 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Gospel This Kenner family gospel group appears regularly at Jazz Fest to perform passionate versions of gospel classics.

Connie Jones' Crescent City Jazz
3 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Old-time trumpeter Conrad R. 'Connie' Jones III celebrates his 70th birthday this year as he looks back on a lifetime of traditional New Orleans jazz playing. Jones was lead trumpet in Pete Fountain's band from 1967-74, at which point he joined the Dukes of Dixieland. Jones knows the tradition firsthand and will definitely have his fans second-lining by the end of the show.

Raful Neal Jr.
3 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues This blues harmonica giant, known as 'the Little Walter of Louisiana,' has been recording since 1958. He is also a musical patriarch who sometimes plays with his guitarist sons, Kenny and Raful Jr. Neal. A cousin of the late Ernie K-Doe, Neal began his career in Baton Rouge in a band that also included Buddy Guy.

The Topcats
3 p.m., Sprint Stage, Rock The Topcats are one of New Orleans' most popular cover bands, and have rocked Metairie dance clubs, church socials, weddings and benefits for years.

Jones Benally Family
3:30 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Native American The Jones Benally family comes from the Black Mesa area in Arizona. They are Din&233; (Navajo) people whose patriarch, Jones Benally, is a traditional medicine man and champion hoop dancer. Three of his children -- Jeneda, Clayson and Clover -- dance and sing traditional music with dad. Clayson, Jeneda and their brother Klee also have a punk-rock band that plays political songs like 'Mean Things Happenin' In This World,' 'Corn Song' and 'Woody Guthrie,' music set to unpublished Guthrie poems.

Rebecca Malope, Gospel Queen of South Africa
3:30 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Gospel South Africans can't seem to get enough of this powerful gospel singer, who was Voted Best Female Vocalist in a Johannesburg 'star search' competition in 1987. Ten of her 20 albums have gone gold or platinum, she is in constant demand for concerts and appearances at special events, and will be making her first-ever Jazz Fest appearance. Her music is yet another expression of the strong tradition of choral singing that found a kindred spirit in Christian hymn singing brought to South Africa by missionaries centuries ago.

Val & Love Alive Fellowship Choir
3:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel Led by Val Bemiss-Robertson, this powerful choir rocks with the enthusiasm that comes with youth.

ReBirth Brass Band
3:45 p.m., Acura Stage, Brass Band More than 20 years ago, the guys from ReBirth Brass Band, dressed in jeans and T-shirts, infused the local brass band tradition with music from pop artists like Michael Jackson. Original member Kermit Ruffins left in 1993, but the Brothers Frazier -- Philip on tuba and Keith on bass drum -- continue to push the envelope, adding rap and whatever else sounds good. Their 2001 release, Hot Venom, showed as much. And among second-liners, the band is still known for walking at ReBirth speed -- the fastest clip in town. The new release, ReBirth for Life, hits stores on April 20.

CRITIC'S PICK
Geno Delafose & French Rockin' Boogie

4 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Zydeco For fans of traditional zydeco, the hard-touring Geno Delafose is the standard-bearer. Unlike most zydeco bandleaders, he equally commands the single-row, triple-row and piano key accordions, meaning he can offer a funky take on a Boozoo Chavis two-step and then turn on a dime with a Clifton Chenier-style blues. Don't miss him.

Branford Marsalis
4:05 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz More eclectic in his sensibilities than his more purist younger brother, Wynton, saxophonist Branford Marsalis has played with a wide range of musicians including the Grateful Dead, Widespread Panic and Sting as well as serving a brief stint as the bandleader on The Tonight Show. With every appearance and gig, Branford invites accusations of not 'keeping it real,' yet the overall result has been a much richer musical palette, as he proves on his latest release The Steep Anthology (Columbia/Legacy). Branford can look at jazz from several different perspectives, and we're a better listening audience for it. (See CD reviews in this issue.)

Clarence 'Frogman' Henry
4:15 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, R&B Clarence 'Frogman' Henry has still got it. Decades after his hits made the charts and got him a slot opening for the Beatles, he is still in fine form. And no matter how many times you hear his classic voice growl 'Ain't Got No Home' and 'Because I Do,' they still sound great. A true New Orleans legend.

Young Tuxedo Brass Band
4:15 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Brass Band Gregg Stafford -- trumpet player, Preservation Hall regular, and local school teacher -- discovered as an adult that he was related to famed New Orleans trumpet player Henry 'Red' Allen. But, as a kid, he didn't know that he was kin to any musicians. So he created a musical family, coming through Danny Barker's Fairview Baptist Church band and a series of older brass bands including Gibson, Harold 'Duke' Dejan's Olympia, and the Young Tuxedo. The Young Tuxedo, then led by alto saxophonist Herman Sherman, has been led by Stafford since 1984.

CRITIC'S PICK
RiZen

4:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This quartet of young women recorded RiZen, their first album of R&B-influenced gospel last year, but their energy has to be seen in person or on the RiZen Live DVD.

Rockin' Dopsie & the Zydeco Twisters
4:30 p.m., Sprint Stage, Zydeco A limber rubboard player who learned at the feet of the master Cleveland Chenier, Rockin' Dopsie offers a crowd-pleasing mix of old R&B and pop. His anything-goes approach doesn't make him a favorite of the zydeco dance crowd, but Festgoers who want to hear Louisiana versions of the oldies will want to check him out.

Derek Miller
4:40 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Blues Canadian rocker Derek Miller's songwriting prowess is the key to his studio debut album Music Is the Message, but his live shows turn on the power of his hard rocking trio. They like their blues mixed in with some rock crunch north of the 49th parallel, and Miller fills the power trio guitarist/frontman role with gusto. Check out 'War Shack,' 'Lovesick Blues #49,' 'Jaded Are My Wings' and 'The End of the World.'

Jones Benally Family
5:15 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American The Jones Benally family comes from the Black Mesa area in Arizona. They are Din&233; (Navajo) people whose patriarch, Jones Benally, is a traditional medicine man and champion hoop dancer. Three of his children -- Jeneda, Clayson and Clover -- dance and sing traditional music with dad. Clayson, Jeneda and their brother Klee also have a punk-rock band that plays political songs such as 'Mean Things Happenin' In This World,' 'Corn Song' and 'Woody Guthrie,' music set to unpublished Guthrie poems.

Macy Gray
5:25 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, R&B Is there a more distinct, more idiosyncratic voice in R&B today than Macy Gray? Well, that might overshadow a burgeoning artist who appears to be getting better and more self-assured with each album, as witnessed in last year's The Trouble With Being Myself (Epic). Writing the songs and co-producing with Dallas Austin (Pink, TLC, Blu Cantrell), Gray has drawn rave reviews. Brash enough to envy but just vulnerable enough to identify with, Gray is one of the bright young national lights at this year's Fest.

Lenny Kravitz
5:30 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock There may be better soul rockers out there, but there is no one with Lenny Kravitz's brazen sense of style or sensuality. He is all but shameless in his derivative nature; Paul McCartney (or Jeff Lynne), for but one example, could've sued him over 'Let Love Rule.' But Kravitz, a part-part-time New Orleanian, has been around long enough and is wise enough to stake out his own territory on the musical landscape. His latest CD, Baptism (Virgin), hits stores May 18.

Rosie Ledet 'The Zydeco Sweetheart' & the Zydeco Playboys
5:30 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Zydeco One of the highlights of the recent all-star Creole Bred zydeco compilation is Rosie Ledet's powerhouse contribution to the Clifton Chenier classic, 'I'm Coming Home.' It's yet another reminder that Ledet remains one of zydeco's brightest ascending stars, a soulful singer who brings R&B stylings to her zydeco. Ledet could still be one break-out album away from achieving crossover fame.

John Mooney & Bluesiana
5:35 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Before he was 25, John Mooney had already been tutored by Son House and Professor Longhair. Is it any wonder, then, that an authority no less than Bonnie Raitt dubbed him the best slide guitarist in the country? Mooney's guitar playing is nothing short of dangerous; there's an edge to it that can make you shudder in mid-solo. As he proved once again on 2002's All I Want (Blind Pig), few artists can so seamlessly fuse Delta blues with New Orleans funk.

Bessie Smith Revue featuring Juanita Brooks & Barbara Shorts
5:40 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Blues A prodigy of Ma Rainey and a blueswoman known for being rough and tough onstage and off, Bessie Smith (1895-1937) enjoyed a brief but brilliant career. Two local singers, Juanita Brooks and Barbara Shorts, whose styles range from gospel to R&B, seek to recapture Smith's past glory.

New Home Ministries Mass Choir
5:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This choir large choir draws members from New Home Ministeries' four locations in the metropolitan New Orleans area.

CRITIC'S PICK
Irvin Mayfield & the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra

5:50 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz The New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, under the creative direction of trumpeter Irvin Mayfield and pianist Ronald Markham, plays repertory jazz from the masters as well as newly commissioned works. The orchestra's latest work is Mayfield's acclaimed 'Strange Fruit,' inspired by the 1939 Billie Holiday recording. It's the story of a white mob's lynching of a young black man who was seeing a white woman. Mayfield says the piece is influenced by Tchaikovsky, Duke Ellington and Ornette Coleman.

Irma Thomas and the Professionals
5:55 p.m., Sprint Stage, R&B When Garrison Keillor returned to New Orleans recently to record his popular public-radio program, A Prairie Home Companion, he was wise enough (this time) to go straight to the top of the city's musical mountain with guest Irma Thomas. She's not called 'The Soul Queen of New Orleans' for nothing; the woman who sang 'Time Is on My Side' and 'Ruler of My Heart' before the Rolling Stones and Otis Redding (respectively) got their paws on them is still going strong after all these years. And she just may have the sunniest smile in town.

Ingrid Lucia
6 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Traditional Jazz Another new-school diva well versed in the style and sound of early female jazz vocalists, Ingrid Lucia has been a local favorite since she was first noticed standing on street corners singing traditional jazz classics. Now, her sets are a deft blend of Latin, blues, jazz and pop. Her latest CD is Hotel Child. (See CD reviews in this issue.)


Sunday, April 25


Parades:

Noon, Olympia Aid, Uptowner's Hobo Clowns and Divine Ladies SAPCs with Smitty Dee's Brass Band
1 p.m., Young Magnolias, White Cloud Hunters and Flaming Arrows Mardi Gras Indians
2 p.m., Perfect Gentlemen, New Look and Lady Sequence SAPCs with Pin Stripe Brass Band
3 p.m., Ninth Ward Hunters, Comanche and New Orleans Rhythm Mardi Gras Indians

4 p.m., Untouchables, Furious Five and Single Ladies SAPCs with New Birth Brass Band

Antioch Gospel Singers
11 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This New Orleans-based gospel group sings traditional gospel.

Freestyle Nation
11 a.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Funk The New Orleans group combines jazz, soul, and gospel in the best seventies funk tradition.

Big Al Carson's Rare Connexion Band
11:15 a.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Blues shouter, post-Barry White sex symbol, bawdy bard of Bourbon Street and occasional Santa Claus, Carson is one of the best entertainers in New Orleans and you can bet he'll have the Jazz Fest audience in the palm of his meaty hand. The man-mountain's voice is an incredible instrument, with a range capable of window-rattling bass intonations and choirboy soprano turns. This will be the 'G' version of Carson's blues; the raunchy stuff happens at the Funky Pirate.

Heritage School of Music Jazz Ensemble
11:15 a.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz This group of high school students directed by avant-garde jazz saxophonist Kidd Jordan plays both traditional and contemporary jazz.

CRITIC'S PICK
Jason Marsalis

11:15 a.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz Considered by some as talented as any of his more famous brothers, drummer Jason Marsalis gained his chops from playing with his father at Snug Harbor as well as great Monday night sets at the Funky Butt. He has added the vibraphone to his repertoire as well as his first instruments, so he could take a turn at either.

Percussion, Inc.
11:15 a.m., Sprint Stage, World New Orleans percussionist Kenyatta Simon directs this group examining world rhythms from Africa to New Orleans.

The Vintage Jazzmen of Paris featuring Tori Robinson
11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Take one French jazz band specializing in traditional New Orleans jazz and mix with one Florida-born singer of Southern gospel music. Even if not inclined to swallow the incredible hyperbole from the French press, believe the fact that their 2002 Jazz Fest appearance was followed by invitations to return to New Orleans for French Quarter Fest and this year's Jazz Fest.

A.J. Loria
11:30 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Contemporary Jazz The contemporary jazz of Loria finds the pianist among fine company in the grand local tradition of bandleaders at the keys. Also an accomplished composer, Loria is noted for his single 'Ain't Nothin' Like It,' the first commercial recording to feature Wynton and Branford Marsalis.

Hot 8 Brass Band
11:30 a.m., Acura Stage, Brass Band About 10 years ago, two young brass bands -- the Looney Tunes and the High Steppers -- united to form the Hot 8. The octet is led by tuba player Bennie Pete, and the band's music mix reflects its makeup -- youngsters straight out of high school and seasoned instrumentalists like trumpeter Raymond Williams who recorded with the likes of Jackie McLean before joining the band in 2001.

Zulu Gospel Ensemble
11:45 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This choir featuring traditional gospel is made up of members of the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club.

Cynthia Liggins-Thomas
12:05 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Gospel New Orleanian Liggins-Thomas left the Stellar Award-winning Blessed for a solo career. Last fall, she recorded All About Love, an impassioned collection of contemporary gospel with traditional roots, and for her efforts earned a Big Easy Entertainment Award nomination.

After the Fact
12:20 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Pop The five-piece After the Fact is making its Jazz Fest debut after two years of playing Top-40, R&B, soul, and country in Northshore clubs. Lead singer Ronnie Smallwood comes from a family that plays old-school country, grew up in Chalmette playing acoustic guitar, and plans a Jazz Fest set that includes covers of Santana's 'Smooth' and -- as the finale -- Dobie Gray's 'Drift Away.'

Larry Sieberth
12:20 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz Pianist Larry Sieberth has been a low-key presence on the jazz scene in New Orleans for the past 25 years. He's played with everyone from Leigh Harris and James Black to several musical theater productions. He is consistently good and sometimes flashy.

CRITIC'S PICK
World Leader Pretend

12:20 p.m., Sprint Stage, Rock This New Orleans rock band has been listening to British pop from the Beatles to Radiohead, and the results are catchy with unpredictable hooks. The band is finishing its follow-up to 2002's Fit for Faded, where gentle melodies could build to Who-like rave-ups.

James Andrews
12:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Jazz/R&B James Andrews started out as lead singer and trumpeter of the New Birth Brass Band and went on to local success leading his own group. Andrews is related to several other well-known New Orleans musicians including Prince LaLa and Jesse Hill. Dr. John sat in on his NYNO release, Satchmo of the Ghetto, which showcased Andrews' range on traditional jazz, funk, R&B and acid-jazz.

Joe Krown
12:25 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Krown is an equally adept piano player and organist. His solo gigs show him to be student of the great New Orleans piano players, while behind the Hammond B-3 with his Organ Combo, he recalls Jimmy Smith. He is the keyboard player in Clarence 'Gatemouth' Brown's band, and his most recent CD is Sansone, Krown and Fohl, recorded with Jumpin' Johnny Sansone and Organ Combo (and Dr. John band) member John Fohl.

The Bester Sisters
12:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This family gospel group has been together for more than two decades, and now it includes a second generation of Besters.

Allen Fontenot & the Country Cajuns
12:45 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Cajun Cajun fiddler Allen Fontenot's long career has included annual Jazz Fest appearances for nearly three decades, along with sharing stages with country stars such as Conway Twitty and Ernest Tubb. His music has shown up on numerous soundtracks, including the 1975 Charles Bronson flick, Hard Times (set in New Orleans). Expect spirited Cajun two-steps and waltzes with more than a hint of country and swamp pop.

Monk Boudreaux & the Golden Eagles Mardi Gras Indians
12:50 p.m., Acura Stage, Mardi Gras Indian It was Big Chief Joseph 'Monk' Boudreaux, son of the Mardi Gras Indian called Jumper, who strung the beads onto the Indian head that in 1974 appeared on the cover of the now-legendary Wild Magnolias. That album was the debut of the Wild Magnolias, led by Boudreaux and his childhood friend Bo Dollis. The two grew up near each other Uptown, performed side by side at the first Jazz & Heritage Festival in 1970, and for 30 years traveled the world together until several years ago, when Boudreaux left to form his own band.

Ringo
1:10 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, South African Cape Town's Sindile 'Ringo' Madlingozi has a reputation as one of South Africa's best live performers. While in school, he was the lead vocalist for the popular a cappella group Peto before striking out on his own in 1996 with the highly successful Vukani. He has collaborated with artists such as Teddy Pendergrass, Simply Red and UB40, and in South Africa, he has collaborated with Hugh Masekela and Busi Mhlongo, demonstrating a willingness to blend the traditional with the contemporary.

Rejubilation Evangelical Community Choir
1:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This Thibodeaux-based interdenominational youth choir appears regularly at Jazz Fest, performing an enthusiastic mix of contemporary and traditional gospel.

Rudy's Caribbean Funk Band
1:25 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Caribbean A highly respected and ubiquitous local figure, Rudy Mills is so dedicated to Caribbean and Latin American culture that he even created a festival, Inter-Fest, held in Armstrong Park in the fall. With his band, Rudy's sound is a tight mix of reggae and Latin influences. His latest CD is a collaboration with poet Arturo Pfister, Arturo & Friends.

Jeremy Davenport
1:30 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz Trumpeter Davenport plays mainstream jazz honed during his time on the road with Harry Connick Jr. and his residency at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel's French Quarter Bar. There is a touch of Chet Baker in both his looks and sound, and this is a good thing.

CRITIC'S PICK
Supagroup

1:30 p.m., Sprint Stage, Rock People describing New Orleans' Supagroup mention AC/DC and Aerosmith, but with brothers Chris and Benji Lee's knack for hooks, Cheap Trick would be equally appropriate. Last year's eponymous release, featuring the radio single 'What's Your Problem,' shows the band amused and in love with everything nutty and trashy about rock 'n' roll. The CD also shows national audiences what locals have known for years -- that Benji Lee is one of the hottest young rock guitarists around.

Wanda Rouzan & a Taste of New Orleans
1:30 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, R&B New Orleans' 'sweetheart' defies limiting musical description, but it's safe to say it's a local flavor that runs through her blend of R&B, jazz and pop. Her long and storied career has elevated her into status as ambassador of New Orleans music. She's also a talented actress and entertainer.

Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band
1:35 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz Few voices are as instantly recognizable on local morning radio as the baritone of Bob French on WWOZ. And anyone who has spent a Monday night at the packed Bob French and Friends gig at Donna's Bar & Grill can tell you that no one can preside from the stage like him -- and he does it while playing classic rhythms and balancing a glass of cognac on his drum.

Jones Benally Family
2 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American The Jones Benally family comes from the Black Mesa area in Arizona. They are Din&233; (Navajo) people whose patriarch, Jones Benally, is a traditional medicine man and champion hoop dancer. Three of his children -- Jeneda, Clayson and Clover -- dance and sing traditional music with dad. Clayson, Jeneda and their brother Klee also have a punk-rock band that plays political songs like 'Mean Things Happenin' In This World,' 'Corn Song' and 'Woody Guthrie,' music set to unpublished Guthrie poems.

The Melody Clouds
2 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent This a cappella group led by Leo Jackson has sung traditional gospel yearly at Jazz Fest since 1978.

Dirty Dozen Brass Band
2:10 p.m., Acura Stage, Brass Band The Dirty Dozen, which in its 25 years helped salvage the languishing brass band tradition in New Orleans, establishes three distinct points -- brass band, funk and jazz -- and continues to explore the interconnectedness of those three related genres in its music. While brass bands are often cited for their funky, raw, sometimes ragged edges, the Dirty Dozen can have it both ways; they're stellar musicians who know when to make it gritty. The band's latest release, Funeral for a Friend (Ropeadope), due out May 3, is a tribute to the late Anthony 'Tuba Fats' Lacen.

CRITIC'S PICK
Hackberry Ramblers

2:10 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Cajun/Western Swing The recent PBS documentary Make 'Em Dance: The Hackberry Ramblers' Story put the national spotlight on the enduring musical friendship of fiddler Luderin Darbone and accordionist Edwin Duhon, who founded the Ramblers in 1933, and are still making their crowds dance 70 years later. The Ramblers' set is not to be missed; much more than living history, this Grammy-nominated band brings both passion and humor to its Texas swing-accented Cajun music.

Patrice Fisher & Arpa with Carlos Ponce of Bolivia
2:30 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz Patrice Fisher is an accomplished harp player who mixes folkloric, jazz, New Age and world music styles deftly. Though Fisher's background is Celtic harp, she has played with musicians from Brazil, Puerto Rico, Guatemala and Bolivia. Bolivian Carlos Ponce will accompany her at Jazz Fest. Look for her to play selections from her albums Wandering and Embrace of the Harp.

Vivaz
2:30 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Latin Vivaz brings an innovative, intense style of Latin grooves in a big-band setting. Sounds of jazz and salsa pour from two percussionists, two trumpets, two trombones, piano, upright bass and guitar. Expect a mix of standards with originals composed by guitarist Javier Gutierrez.

Ellis Marsalis
2:40 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz The pater familias of the ultimate musical family, pianist Ellis Marsalis is the consummate jazzman, a great musician and educator who can be heard playing solo piano, trad jazz, post-bop variations, standards, blues or with Ornette Coleman as he did last year at Jazz Fest. His sons -- trumpeter Wynton, saxophonist Branford, trombonist Delfeayo and drummer Jason -- are among the many working jazz musicians taught by Marsalis. His new album, On the First Occasion, features Jason on drums.

CRITIC'S PICK
Rebecca Malope, Gospel Queen of South Africa

2:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel South Africans can't seem to get enough of this powerful gospel singer who was Voted Best Female Vocalist in a Johannesburg 'star search' competition in 1987. Ten of her 20 albums have gone gold or platinum, she is in constant demand for concerts and appearances at special events, and will be making her first-ever Jazz Fest appearance. Her music is yet another expression of the strong tradition of choral singing that found a kindred spirit in Christian hymn singing brought to South Africa by missionaries centuries ago.

Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience
2:45 p.m., Sprint Stage, Zydeco Even the big Sprint Stage can hardly contain the exuberant accordionist Terrance Simien, a barefoot stage-stalker who's not above a little crowd-surfing. Offstage, Simien is just as tireless as a cultural activist, bringing his Creole for Kidz program to school groups around the country, and organizing and lobbying for a zydeco-Cajun category for the Grammy awards. (Hey, if polka and New Age have their own categories &138; .) At today's show, expect an eclectic approach to zydeco that folds in pop and reggae, along with unique nods to the tradition.

Eddie Bo
2:50 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, R&B Eddie Bo is a true hero of New Orleans music. He is one of the last of the 'junker' blues players, and people half his age could learn from his energetic performances. Bo has been known to levitate with joy when he plays his hits 'I'm Wise,' 'Hook and Sling,' 'Hard Times' and any number of classic New Orleans rhythm and blues songs.

Louisiana Repertory Jazz Ensemble
3 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz The LRJE was founded in 1980 by clarinetist S. Frederick Start to play traditional jazz on original, turn-of-the-century jazz ensemble instruments. The group concentrates on pre-jazz, blues, ragtime and early jazz material dating from 1890-1930. Expect to hear material along the lines of 'Canal Street Blues,' 'Red Man Blues,' 'Oriental Jazz,' 'Perdido Street Blues' and 'Buddy's Habit.'

Crocodile Gumboot Dancers
3:20 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, South African Like many rural South African traditions, the custom of dancing with ankle percussion was transformed in the migrant mineworkers' camps and the reservation-like townships. Wearing the standard 'gumboot' footwear of the gold miners, but adorned with urban versions of percussive materials such as bottle tops, the Crocodile Gumboot Dancers perform a unique set of dances and songs that represents a blending of the many cultures that worked and socialized together in the mining camps.

Second Nazarene Church Choir
3:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This ensemble is actually a blend of three church choirs to create 100 members of all ages performing traditional and contemporary gospel.

Dr. John
3:40 p.m., Acura Stage, R&B Dr. John is the very definition of a New Orleans musician in his devotion to reinterpreting this city's rich R&B history while establishing his own artistic identity -- that, and refusing to slow down in his mid-60s. The Night Tripper gained mainstream fame in the early '70s with his timeless 'Right Place, Wrong Time' and has spent the past three decades lending his Booker-meets-Longhair piano playing and Ninth Ward patois to countless other faves. His new album, due out in June and recorded at Piety Street Recording, is an all-star affair.

Brasilliance!
3:50 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Latin The indigenous, infectious groove of Brazil forms the basis for Brasilliance!'s original compositions, though expect a few covers from masters such as Antonio Carlos Jobim in this set. The sextet moves between bossa nova, samba and more with an ear toward improvisational adventures. (See CD reviews in this issue.)

Johnny Clegg Band featuring the music of Juluka and Savuka
3:55 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, South African This singer/composer/dancer, along with Zulu musician Sipho Mchunu, bucked the apartheid system back in the early 1970s when they formed a mixed-race duo, expanding a few years later to a six-piece band called Juluka. The band gained great fame in South Africa in the face of government attempts to thwart its ability to perform live and demonstrate unity among the races. After Mchunu's departure, an eventual international recording contract brought Clegg and Juluka (and later Savuka) to the world through tours of Europe and the U.S.

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers
4:05 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Jazz Pop quiz: Who's the most hard-working and most popular entertainer in New Orleans? OK, it's a problematic question, but is there anyone more loveable than Kermit? There's a reason why he's compared to Louis Armstrong, not so much for being an over-arching musical influence but because of how he makes his voice and trumpet so instantly recognizable and fun. He is the reason to go to Le Bon Temps Roule on Wednesdays, Vaughan's on Thursdays, and anywhere else he plays on any given day.

Chris Thomas King's 20th Century Blues
4:10 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, Blues Chris Thomas King started taking the blues into this century late during the last century. He combines blues progressions with hip-hop beats and rhythm and subtle vocals into something few can do successfully. His burgeoning acting career includes turns as blues musicians in the Coen Brothers' O Brother, Where Are Thou?, and Wim Wenders' The Soul of a Man for Martin Scorsese's blues series last year.

CRITIC'S PICK
Joseph 'Zigaboo' Modeliste & the Funk Revue

4:10 p.m., Sprint Stage, Funk Perhaps rock critic Dave Marsh said it best: 'Modeliste is probably the most brilliant American funk percussionist of the contemporary era.' No understatement this, but the reason for it is Modeliste's ability to take second-line drumming from the brass band and incorporate it into funk music. As the Meters' drummer, he is as responsible for the New Orleans funk sound as anyone else, if not more. This year's appearance is even more special: Check out I'm on the Right Track, featuring guest turns by Dr. John, Bernie Worrell, Ivan Neville and David Torkanowsky. (See CD reviews in this issue.)

Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band
4:15 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Zydeco A native of Church Point, Chubby Carrier comes from a distinguished zydeco family that includes his father, Roy, along with the legendary Creole fiddler Bebe Carriere. Chubby developed his high-energy show-band approach when he was touring in Terrance Simien's band. His most recent CD, Ain't No Party Like a Chubby Party!, pays homage to his roots with a new version of the Bebe Carriere favorite 'Blue Runner.'

Lamont Jackson & A New Beginning
4:25 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel This 14-voice choir is fronted by Hammond native Lamont Jackson.

New Leviathan Oriental Foxtrot Orchestra
4:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Americana This highly disciplined musical laboratory attempts to shed light on the origins of New Orleans jazz by meticulously recreating the music that immediately preceded it. Working from sheet music and the research collected by member historians including Bruce Boyd Raeburn, these jazz scientists make music that is both fun and educational. Last year's Burning Sands: The New Leviathan Orchestra Goes to War is a great vehicle for the band's madcap vocalist and banjo player George Schmidt.

Sharon Martin
4:55 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Pop One of New Orleans' most popular singers, Martin has a vibrancy all her own as she tears through a wide range of soul classics and dance favorites.

Jones Benally Family
5:15 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American The Jones Benally family comes from the Black Mesa area in Arizona. They are Din&233; (Navajo) people whose patriarch, Jones Benally, is a traditional medicine man and champion hoop dancer. Three of his children -- Jeneda, Clayson and Clover -- dance and sing traditional music with dad. Clayson, Jeneda and their brother Klee also have a punk-rock band that plays political songs like 'Mean Things Happenin' In This World,' 'Corn Song' and 'Woody Guthrie,' music set to unpublished Guthrie poems.

Donald Lawrence & Tri-City Singers
5:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel With 34 voices and a full band, this acclaimed choir makes a joyful noise.

CRITIC'S PICK
Steve Winwood

5:30 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock Steve Winwood's passion for R&B had many incarnations -- through Blind Faith, the Spencer Davis Group and, of course, Traffic, which spawned countless '60s and '70s hits ('Gimme Some Lovin',' 'Can't Find My Way Home,' 'Dear Mr. Fantasy'). Even Winwood's tepid solo projects have their charm -- the Count will stubbornly defend 1980's Arc of a Diver. Winwood, who's had more musical lives than a cat, is back in impressive form on his latest CD, last year's About Time (Wincraft Music), which features his crack back-up crew.

Etta James & the Roots Band
5:40 p.m., Popeye's Blues Tent, R&B Yes, Etta James took the name of her CD, Let's Roll (Private Music) from Todd Beamer's firm battle cry to overtake Al Qaeda hijackers on 9/11, a tribute to a heroic moment. Let's Roll is the 66-year-old's follow-up to her Gammy-nominated live album, Burnin' Down the House, showing that James refuses to rest on the laurels of such classic R&B hits as 'Roll With Me Henry,' 'Tell Mama' and 'At Last.' With her raspy vocals and fondness for slide-guitar blues rock, it's no wonder James has influenced every female rocker including Janis Joplin and Bonnie Raitt.

Cowboy Mouth
5:45 p.m., Sprint Stage, Rock Few bands in New Orleans possess such a luminous presence within their ranks as Cowboy Mouth's bigger-than-life drummer Fred LeBlanc. He is a holy terror in his drumming, his songwriting and frenetic singing; sometimes it's easy to forget there's a real band in there. As they proved on last year's release, Uh-Oh (33rd Street), LeBlanc, Paul Sanchez and John Thomas Griffith proved they can still produce shimmering and energetic pop-rock (Mary LaSang is now the band's full-time bassist). A monster magnet live, Cowboy Mouth still rocks damn hard.

Gap Band
5:45 p.m., South African Freedom @ Congo Square Stage, Funk Fun Jazz Fest lineup trivia: The Gap Band's Charlie Wilson is the uncle of Mr. Shizzle himself, Snoop Dogg. So you can see where the fun funk, or funky fun, began -- with the Gap Band, authors of such whimsical '70s classics as 'You Dropped a Bomb on Me,' 'Burn Rubber on Me,' 'Outstanding' and 'Party Train.' It's hard to believe the Brothers Wilson -- Charlie, Robert and Ronnie -- are the songs of a Pentecostal minister from that funk hotbed, Tulsa, Okla. Charlie's also known for his alliance with New Orleans' own No Limit artists, including Master P, Mystikal and Mia X.

Jonathan Butler
5:45 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz The sensual, peaceful music of this South African acoustic jazz guitarist seems to transcend life's difficulties, drawn from very personal and unique life experience that was anything but tranquil. The sensitivity of Butler's musical expression gives little indication of the horrors of apartheid that he witnessed as a member of a traveling troupe during a decade-long touring career through the townships of South Africa that began when he was less than 10 years old.

Carrie Smith
5:50 p.m., Economy Hall Tent, Blues Bessie Smith-style blues belter Carrie Smith made her debut at the 1957 Newport Jazz Festival as part of a church choir. The Georgia native made her biggest impact playing the role of Bessie Smith in Dick Hyman's 1974 Broadway production of Satchmo Remembered, which led to her recording and touring as a solo act. She's performed with the New York Jazz Repertory Orchestra, Tyree Glenn, and the World's Greatest Jazz Band, as well as her own group.

Nathan & the Zydeco Cha Chas
5:50 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage, Zydeco It's been a bit of a dry spell for zydeco recordings, so rumors that Nathan Williams is at work on a new CD is good news indeed -- especially considering that his previous work for Rounder Records includes some of the most satisfying zydeco tunes ever recorded. Williams is a master on the piano key accordion, as well as an electric performer and a songwriter with a particular talent for incorporating Creole themes and traditions in now-classic songs like 'Everything on the Hog.' He's one of the best. The Elements 6:10 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Reggae The eclectic reggae of The Elements comes downriver to Jazz Fest from the group's Baton Rouge home. Culturally diverse with members that hail from south Louisiana, the Caribbean and Latin America, The Elements offer a philosophical place "Where Rhythm is Life, and Life is Reggae Music" and since 1983 have played a mix of styles from roots to dancehall.

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