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FRIDAY, APRIL 28

New Orleans Jazz Vipers
11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
The seven pieces of the all-out swinging Jazz Vipers draw a crowd that straddles an interesting intersection: the line in the sand is always drawn between the perpetual dancers and the dedicated sitters. These are cool musicians who play hot music on a collection of traditional string and brass instruments. Of particular note is how acoustic guitarist John Rodli plays rhythm, keeping the whole thing from careening off track at even the most "out there" moments. Their most recent release is 2004's Live on Frenchmen Street. www.jazzvipers.com

David Egan
11:20 a.m., Acura Stage
Roots Rock/Blues
A major player in the Lafayette music scene, keyboardist David Egan is best known for his work with Fil é , not to mention the songs he wrote that other people have sung; artists such as Joe Cocker, Solomon Burke and Mavis Staples have all recorded tunes cobbled from Egan's pen. Egan's last album was 2003's 20 Years of Trouble, and the Shreveport native's brand of sound appeals to those who like their music raw and real, bouncing between heartfelt and sardonic. www.davidegan.net

Los Sagitarios
11:25 a.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
LatinThe popular Latin group performs.

Coolbone Brass Band
11:30 a.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Brass Band
Coolbone formed in the mid-1990s and is, like the Soul Rebels, one of the New Orleans brass bands most closely identified with fusing hip-hop and brass band music. The band, fronted by trombonist and vocalist Steven "Coolbone" Johnson, has four records under its belt. The members most recently contributed a track called "I Found a New Baby" to the post-Katrina compilation From the Lonestar to the Gulf Coast, featuring New Orleans and Texas musicians.

Loyola University Jazz Ensemble
11:30 a.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
While some of the university's programs may be cut, Loyola music majors can probably rest easy. The School of Music has produced some heavy hitters in the music world é Victor Goines (saxophone), Brian Blade (drums), Mark Mullins (trombone) and John Gros (keyboards) are all alumni. Catching the Jazz Ensemble's set at the Fest could be akin to scouting minor-league baseball and watching the next great slugger emerge from obscurity.

Panorama Jazz Band
11:40 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Jazz
Ben Schenck, the protagonist of the Panorama Jazz Band, raids the musical pantry of forms like klezmer and polka and melds them into a captivating jazz tapestry. Odd time signatures and clarinet solos out of left field that melt into a wash of accordion and a belching sousaphone é these are indications that Panorama is inappropriate for rigid style definitions and therefore pleasing to all sorts of ears. www.panoramajazzband.com

Inspirational Gospel Singers
11:45 a.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
Formed in Kenner in 1985, this troupe has been belting out spiritual harmonies in the Gospel Tent
for more than two decades now. The group has released two albums é 1988's Jesus, I Love What You're Doing for Me, and 1992's At the River. A perfect inspirational first stop on the first morning of the 2006 Fest.

Dukes of Dixieland
12:20 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
The history of the Dukes of Dixieland is quite the saga; the current version of the band dates to 1974. Prior to that, a different form of the Dukes can trace its lineage to the mid-1940s. Whatever incarnation Dixieland purists prefer, the fact of the matter is the casual music fan is going to get a pretty darn faithful representation of the Dixieland sound from the current band. For those who love minutia-filled hours of comparing and contrasting, there are dozens of records out there from the pre- and post-1974 bands. www.dukesofdixieland.com

Anders Osborne
12:30 p.m., Acura Stage
Roots Rock
The rare triple-threat performer will be on display here é Osborne is a noted songwriter ("Watch the Wind Blow By" was a No. 1 country hit for Tim McGraw), scorching guitar player and distinctive vocalist. The Swedish-born New Orleanian is a comfortable fit in varied musical predicaments, be it a jam with bassist George Porter Jr. and drummer Johnny Vidacovich, a session with Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, jamming with tuba player Kirk Joseph or a festival performance with his crack touring band. www.andersosborne.com

Creole Wild West Mardi Gras Indians
12:30 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Mardi Gras Indian
Mardi Gras Indian scholars generally agree that the Creole Wild West is the oldest tribe in New Orleans, dating back to the late 1800s. Whether it's Super Sunday, Mardi Gras Day or an appearance at Jazz Fest, members of the tribe will no doubt argue that their chief is the prettiest.

The Gospel Inspiration Singers of Boutte
12:35 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
Rounding out this year's regionally focused Gospel Tent
booking, this inspirational troupe brings a traditional spiritual performance in from Boutte.

Jonathan Batiste
12:40 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Contemporary Jazz
Pianist Jonathan Batiste, now a mere 20 years old, is a graduate of NOCCA and current student at Juilliard in New York City. Batiste plays the keys with a skill level that transcends the normal progressions of age and experience. He gets props from jazz greats like Benny Golson and is regarded, along with trumpeter Troy Andrews, as at the vanguard of the next wave of exceptional New Orleans musicians. His 2005 record, Times in New Orleans, features six originals and three covers, including a slinky take on Thelonius Monk's "Straight No Chaser." www.jonathanbatiste.com

CRITIC'S PICK

Mary Griffin
12:45 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
R&B
Mary Griffin can sing é this is a statement that should be said with emphatic enthusiasm. She has been compared favorably to Mariah Carey and Celine Dion and has collaborated with Patti LaBelle. Griffin, a New Orleans native, toured with Mary J. Blige in 2004 as her warm-up act. She has also worked with the R&B singer Jaheim and released several singles on his label. www.marygriffin.net

Bryan Lee & the Blues Power Band
12:50 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Blues
Bryan Lee embodies the concept of "blues power": over the course of a performance, he'll make his axe shriek, groan and growl as he tastefully drifts through the pentatonic scales of the blues guitar. Lee honors the blues canon with songs by Elmore James, Guitar Slim and Muddy Waters that augment his original output. He's played steady gigs in French Quarter bars for years and toured the world over. www.braillebluesdaddy.com

J. Monque'D Blues Band
1:05 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Blues
Living the true low-down blues life is important for a performer's song authenticity, so the fact that J Monque'D used to be a Lucky Dog vendor plays right into the strengths of his Stage
persona. Monque'D plays harmonica and guitar and is known for playful blues romps like "Chitlin' Eatin' Music" and "Mule and a Fool."

Betty Winn & One-A-Chord
1:25 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This all-female octet has been a New Orleans spiritual staple since 1995, bringing powerful, praise-filled harmonies to a repertoire of traditional and contemporary spirituals, as well as originals by former public school teacher Winn. The group, often seen at House of Blues' (now-dormant) gospel brunch, has toured extensively in Germany, Switzerland and France, and released a full-length album, Shout Hallelujah, in 2005.

Lionel Ferbos & the Palm Court Jazz Band
1:45 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Trumpeter Lionel Ferbos is a link to a bygone era, a musician who came of age in the 1930s performing in assorted New Orleans jazz bands. He is best known for his work with Lars Edegran's New Orleans Ragtime Orchestra. Ferbos is now in his 90s and doesn't play publicly much anymore, so it will be a real treat to see him with the Palm Court Jazz Band, harkening back to years prior when he had a standing Saturday night gig at the club.

Michael Skinkus & Moyuba
1:45 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Latin Jazz
Moyuba is the Latin-jazz-and-more project of percussionist extraordinaire Michael Skinkus. Skinkus is a musician's musician and has been featured as a sideman on what feels like a million New Orleans music projects. Skinkus uses Moyuba to focus on Santeria forms, chanting and Bata' drum rhythms.

Keb' Mo'
1:50 p.m., Acura Stage
Blues
Keb' Mo' is one of the most recognizable blues performers in the world today. The Grammy-winning singer and guitarist, known for his gentle voice and finger-picking style, will be featuring songs off his upcoming June release, Suitcase (Epic), at the Fair Grounds. He also might mention his appearance on the soundtrack and in the upcoming (and locally shot) remake of All the King's Men, due out (finally) this fall. www.kebmo.com

Vivaz
2 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Latin Jazz
Vivaz has been a faithful player on the New Orleans Latin music scene since 2001. The band, led by Javier Gutierrez, covers the Latin jazz sound spectrum, jumping from salsa to cha-cha to meringue and beyond. The beefy horn and percussion sections prop up Gutierrez's nylon string guitar plucking, much to the amusement of the practiced dancers often found at Vivaz gigs. Its sound is romantic enough to make lovers of us all. www.vivazlatinband.com

The James Rivers Movement
2:10 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
James Rivers has been on the New Orleans music scene for decades. Fans of the sax player dig his blend of jazz and blues dashed with a New Orleans R&B sensibility. Rivers counts Clint Eastwood as one of his friends, and back in the day he performed with Jackie Wilson and Sam Cooke.

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes
2:15 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Rock
The momentum that is behind some Johnny Sketch jams can be likened to a rhinoceros on speed. The local funk-rock collective tours extensively while maintaining a loyal New Orleans fan base, with well-placed appearances at Krewe of O.A.K. and MOMS Ball parties. Their latest release is Pain, Pleasure, Fear and Opera, and it shows them to be a band that rocks out but isn't shy of its music school pedigree. www.johnnysketch.com

St. Joseph the Worker Choir
2:15 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
Straight out of Marrero and led by Clark Knighten, this group has been on the local gospel scene since the late 1970s. Their clever arrangements of gospel standards have made them a fixture in the Gospel Tent
for years.

T-Salé
2:35 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Cajun
T-Salé boasts an impeccable Cajun music lineage, and the band does their ancestors proud with faithful and respectful renditions of south Louisiana classics and obscure rarities. Brothers Jean-Jacques and Louie Aucoin formed the band initially to honor the memory of their grandfather Cyprien Landreneau, the noted Mamou accordion player. The band's self-titled debut album was released in 2004.

Andrew Hall's Society Brass Band
2:55 p.m.Economy Hall Tent
Brass Band
The specific focus of the Society Brass Band is early brass band traditionals. Andrew Hall is a British native with a reverence for original New Orleans music from the early 20th century. The Vegas odds favor a second line through the Economy Hall Tent
during this set.

Pinettes Brass Band
3 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Brass Band
The Pinettes are something of an anomaly in the brass band world, in that all of their members are female. The group formed at St. Mary's Academy in the early 1990s and continues to show that ladies can have as much brassy soul as men.

The Bester Singers
3:15 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
Led by missionary Rose Bester, this Slidell group was founded almost 20 years ago by the four Bester sisters. This veteran group uses family ties (and good musical genes) to belt out songs of praise and inspiration.

Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience
3:30 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Zydeco
Terrance Simien can best be described as hippy-dippy ambassador of zydeco and Creole culture. He has toured with Dave Matthews and Los Lobos and crafted a zydeco education program for students. For Simien, turning people onto the infectious danceable warmth of zydeco music is a life's mission, whether he's tossing Mardi Gras beads at confused Midwesterners on a tour stop or chatting up Dan Aykroyd on a syndicated radio program. This year marks his 20th appearance at Jazz Fest.

CRITIC'S PICK

Bob Dylan
3:35 p.m., Acura Stage
Rock
Bob Dylan and his never-ending tour call on New Orleans every two years or so. Recent reports from the road indicate Dylan is exclusively playing keyboards and breaking in a new band that features a prominent pedal-steel presence. The one constant in the touring band is bassist Tony Garnier, a Louisiana native. A gander at the setlists reveals Dylan has two alternating sets worked up; one that features a few tracks from Love and Theft, the other that spotlights "Highway 61 Revisited" and "It's All Right Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)." www.bobdylan.com

Charmaine Neville
3:45 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
Charmaine Neville is the rare cabaret singer who can flourish in any setting, be it the comfortable confines of Snug Harbor or onStage
at a large European festival. She dabbles in traditional New Orleans tracks such as "Mardi Gras Mambo," funkifies traditional jazz standards and pulls in selections out of left field like the Beatles' "Yellow Submarine." www.charmainenevilleband.com

Cowboy Mouth
3:55 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Rock
Fronted by the intense and energetic drummer Fred LeBlanc, Cowboy Mouth songs are generally hyper-rockin' affairs with raspy vocals that urge and encourage listeners to overcome obstacles and embody the principle of dogged determination. The band's recent release, Voodoo Shoppe (Eleven Thirty), continues in that tradition. Regarding old-school Cowboy Mouth, the question remains é will "Hurricane Party" be performed? www.cowboymouth.com

Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots
4:05 p.m., Sheraton Fais Do-Do Stage
Zydeco/Blues
The Louisiana Sunspots create organic, festival-ready grooves that are enhanced all the more by standing barefoot in a sun-drenched field with a beer in hand and friends lurking around. Bandleader Bruce "Sunpie" Barnes is a well-respected musicologist with a warmly authoritative singing voice and some serious skills on the harp and accordion. Barnes counts Clifton Chenier and Nigerian juju performer I.K. Dairo as influences, and refers to his music as "bouje bouje" é Cajun for "to move." www.sunpieonline.com

Shades of Praise
4:15 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
New Orleans-based national gospel stars Shades of Praise combines singers from myriad racial and faith backgrounds, united in singing traditional gospel in the African-American church tradition. Formed in fall of 2000 by local jazz vocalist Phil Manuel and Lindy Boggs Literacy Center director Michael Cowan, the group is headed by choirmaster and keyboardist Al Bemiss. They can be seen in WWL-TV's "Spirit of Louisiana" commercials. The group has been featured on National Public Radio and their current release is Joyful Gospel.

Louisiana Repertory Jazz Ensemble
4:20 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Big Band
The jazz ensemble performs.

Hard Headhunters Mardi Gras Indians
4:30 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Mardi Gras Indian
The Hard Headhunters masked and marched on Mardi Gras Day, carrying on the tradition in spite of members being displaced all across the Southeast. Their dedication is in large part a reflection of the determined leadership of their Big Chief, Otto "Fiyo" Dejean Sr.

Yerba Buena
5:20 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Latin
Yerba Buena is a potent cocktail of New York City intensity and Caribbean attitude presented as an aural party concept. Drawing freely from Latin music forms like Afro-Cuban, flamenco, salsa and meringue, Yerba Buena doses these forms with hip-hop and funk brashness, not to mention bilingual lyricism. The band's most recent release, 2005's Island Life (Razor & Tie), features the track "Sugar Daddy," which was nominated for a Billboard Latin Music Award. www.yerbabuenamusic.com

CRITIC'S PICK

Cynthia Liggins-Thomas
5:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
Recently relocated to Dallas after Hurricane Katrina, internationally recognized gospel soloist Cynthia Liggins-Thomas is currently working on a benefit album to be released through (and named after) her nonprofit organization, Let Love Rule. The original tracks on the album are influenced by traditional gospel as well as jazz, blues and R&B, and include two contributions from Ellis Marsalis. Proceeds from the album, which will be released this summer, will benefit both Hurricane Katrina victims and children living with HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe. She is currently the minister of music at All Nations Fellowship Church. Her new release, Let Love Rule, features the contributions of Ellis Marsalis. www.cynthialigginsthomas.com

Irvin Mayfield & the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra
5:30 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
Esteemed New Orleans trumpeter and cultural ambassador Irvin Mayfield fronts and conducts the 16-piece New Orleans Jazz Orchestra when not recording for Basin Street Records. The Orchestra will be hitting Jazz Fest fresh off a West Coast tour designed to demonstrate to our countrymen out there what real New Orleans jazz is all about. Its latest commissioned work, "All the Saints," was favorably received when debuted at Christ Church Cathedral on St. Charles Avenue in November. www.thenojo.com

Ani DiFranco
5:35 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Folk Rock
Ani DiFranco is a renaissance woman, a singer, songwriter, poet, record-label founder and political activist. She loves New Orleans and the city loves her back é she's been spotted at Vaughn's checking out Kermit Ruffins when she's not playing sold-out gigs at House of Blues or doing her thing at Jazz Fest. DiFranco has put out an album a year since 1991; her latest is called Knuckle Down, on her Righteous Babe label. www.righteousbabe.com

BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet
5:40 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Cajun
BeauSoleil is no-holds-barred Cajun music, performed with virtuosity and sparkling with the energy. The band's sound, when it is hitting on all cylinders, has dancing fiddles way out in front while a crisp percussive rhythm rips through the center and guitar licks lurk with a slight menace in the background. Gitane Cajun, released in 2004, captures this essence well, but nothing beats BeauSoleil live. Good music knows no boundaries and reaches across cultural divides on a regular basis, and BeauSoleil represents the Cajun musical perspective well to the rest of the world. www.rosebuds.com/beausoleil.com

CRITIC'S PICK

Dr. John
5:40 p.m., Acura Stage
R&B
Dr. John is rarely seen in the daylight hours; here is an opportunity to see the "Night Tripper" in danger of contracting a sunburn. He's been active in all sorts of Hurricane Katrina relief efforts, contributing his uniquely garbled syntax and funky keyboard sense to benefit concerts and compilation albums highlighting New Orleans music. Sippiana Hurricane is an EP that Dr. John released in November; when considered with last year's N'awlinz: Dis Dat or D'udda, it shows an artist still making music as relevant and listenable as tracks from his 1970s heyday. www.drjohn.com

Olympia Brass Band
5:40 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Brass Band
Olympia is as old-school as it gets in the brass band world; the band can trace its lineage all the way back to 1883. They play the classics and they play them well é funeral dirges, songs of hope, uplifting anthems of redemption, all the while nattily attired in crisp white uniforms and hats. The Olympia presents their music in a pure form absent any genre cross-pollinization, and the brass band world is the better for it é we all need to know and respect the tradition.

Topsy Chapman
5:50 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Long before Britney Spears became a pop icon, there was another girl from Kentwood who made a name for herself in the music business. The difference between the two is that this girl, Topsy Chapman, could actually sing. Now a mom with two girls of her own, Chapman came to attention in New Orleans with her gospel group the Chapmans, then went on to perform on Broadway. She's also toured and recorded traditional jazz with such acts as the Blues Serenaders and the Magnolia Jazz Band. www.topsychapman.com


SATURDAY, APRIL 29

The Elements
11:15 a.m., Acura Stage
Reggae
The Elements are a reggae band, but specialize in the subgenre of soca. Unless you are a compulsive world-music connoisseur, you might not know that soca is a music form from Trinidad & Tobago. It is basically an interpretation, through the Caribbean lens, of American soul and funk from the 70s. www.theelementsband.com

Betsy McGovern & the Poor Clares
11:15 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Folk
Heartaching, beautifully melancholy renderings of songs with an Irish folk pedigree is the cup of tea you receive from a Poor Clares set. The band strikes a tone that is equally appropriate in churches, Irish pubs or a festival setting. Frontwoman Betsy McGovern's voice has drawn comparisons to Judy Collins and Joan Baez, and this is confirmed on the band's latest CD, Revival of the Heart. www.betsymcgovern.com

Rev. Charles Jackson & the Jackson Travelers
11:15 a.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This high-energy family group adds an extra oomph to its praise songs, guaranteed to make audiences shake their hands at the heavens. The five men and two women in the group released an earthy, old-style CD, I Made a Change, last year.

SUBR Jazz Ensemble
11:20 a.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Contemporary Jazz
Southern University in Baton Rouge was the first historically black college to establish a jazz-studies program. American Idol judge Randy Jackson was once a student, not to mention Henry Butler and Donald Harrison. This undergraduate band is under the able stewardship of clarinetist and composer Alvin Batiste.

Percussion Inc.
11:30 a.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Caribbean
The name says it all for this group that, more than most local groups, shows the musical influence that has come from the African Diaspora, with its connecting the dots of African rhythms and Caribbean music.

Connie Jones' Crescent City Jazz Band
11:30 a.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Connie Jones has an impeccable Dixieland pedigree; he played trumpet for seven years with Pete Fountain on Bourbon Street. He was a leading member of the Dukes of Dixieland in the mid-1970s. Equally adept on trumpet and cornet, he's a yearly favorite in the Economy Hall Tent
.

Belton Richard & the Louisiana Aces
11:30 a.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Cajun
Belton Richard retired from regular performing in 2002. Now making infrequent festival appearances, the accordionist blends traditional Cajun with the more contemporary swamp pop. He's been performing with some form of the Louisiana Aces since 1959, and Cajun music scholars credit his band as being the first in the genre to perform with electric bass while perfecting the sound of two fiddles playing in close harmony.

Providence Baptist Church Choir
Noon p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This LaPlace chorus brings sonorous resonance to songs of praise and inspiration. Their united voices can be heard on the Los Hombres Calientes CD, Vol. 4: Vodou Dance (Basin Street).

World Leader Pretend
12:30 p.m., Acura Stage
Rock
World Leader Pretend was once a Loyola college band with lofty aspirations and a Radiohead addiction. Then the members danced the delicate music-business tango, got a record deal with Warner Bros. and became the rare New Orleans rock band that "made it." Their current record, Punches (Warner Bros.), is regularly spun on alternative-rock satellite radio stations, and college girls think they're cool. www.wlpband.com

Jambalaya Cajun Band
12:20 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Cajun
Led by fiddle player Terry Huval, the Jambalaya Cajun band rests comfortably in the epicenter of the south Louisiana music scene. The band gigs extensively in the Lafayette-Eunice-Mamou area. They have a humble yet ardent preservationist perspective, manifested in the way they honor the integrity of older, historic musicians in the Cajun music community.

Mahogany Brass Band
12:30 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Brass Band
Mahogany is the brainchild of local trumpeter Brice Miller, a busy man who is employed in all aspects of the music business: performing, promoting, booking and educating. Miller is an Xavier grad and a fan of Louis Armstrong and Freddie Hubbard. The Mahogany Brass Band is his traditional jazz project.

Tony "Oulabula" Bazley
12:30 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Tony Bazley is a New Orleans drummer with a penchant for cutting loose, as evidenced by his nickname. "Oulabula" has played with Dexter Gordon and Eric Dolphy and has major respect for the work of pioneering jazz drummer "Philly Joe" Jones. This set will be a tribute to Jones.

Basin Street Sheiks
12:45 p.m. and 3:45 p.m., Kids Tent
Jug Band
Advertised as New Orleans' premier jug band, the Sheiks may be New Orleans' only regularly gigging band of its kind. They specialize in satirical tongue-in-cheek puns and nonsensical banter. Like Widespread Panic, they are controversial for receiving two sets at Jazz Fest. The recent loss of washboardist Salty Bean Morgan has been lamented across the Sheik Nation. www.basinstreetsheiks.com

Voices of Distinction
12:45 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
New Orleans Spiritualette singer Audrey Ferguson organized the traditional gospel group Voices of Distinction five years ago along with her daughter, De De Thurmond. Since then, the five-woman group has been performing steadily around New Orleans and released a CD, What You Gonna Do, in 2004.

Clarence "Frogman" Henry
12:55 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
New Orleans R&B
Way back when (1956 to be exact), Frogman Henry scored a big hit on the R&B charts with "Ain't Got No Home." Henry's sang falsetto on the single and his voice sounded like a cross between a little girl and a frog. He's more than just a novelty, though. The Algiers native has recorded other popular songs with Allen Touissant and holds the piano style of Fats Domino in high esteem.

Ritmo Caribeno
12:55 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Latin
A New Orleans Latin music ensemble, Ritmo Caribeno plays the songs and the styles the people like to dance to (salsa, mambo, etc). They used to be a regular draw out at the Copacabana on Airline Drive. During the mid to late 1990s, Fredy Omar was their lead vocalist.

CRITIC'S PICK

Tim Laughlin
1 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Tim Laughlin brings an easy swinging sensibility to his clarinet playing, warming his notes like few local performers. He's comfortable rendering interpretations of classics in the traditional jazz songbook, but believes the genre has room for fresh ideas and new songs. His latest release is Live in Germany. www.timlaughlin.com

Val & Love Alive Choir with Dimensions of Faith
1:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This superchoir is a consolidated group of multiple New Orleans choirs, headed up by Val Bemiss-Robertson, who comes from the talented New Orleans gospel Bemiss family. Expect the combined energy to rock the Tent. The Love Alive choir, which began as a kids' gospel workshop, inspires such loyalty that most members are now in their 20s.

Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers
1:35 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Zydeco
This is zydeco with the subtlety of a sledgehammer, an emotional, full-throttle musical ride. Uninitiated dancers, you've been warned. Dopsie released a live set from 2005's Telluride Blues & Brews Festival called After the Storm. His brother is another notable zydeco performer, Rockin' Dopsie Jr. www.dwaynedopsie.com

Kim Prevost & Bill Solley
1:40 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
The vocalist Kim Prevost performs well-regarded jazz duets with guitarist Bill Solley (her husband). Their album Just in Time received recognition on several Best of Louisiana Music lists in 2005. Prevost is even known to goth rockers é Trent Rezor featured her vocals on his Nine Inch Nails double album, The Fragile. http://kimprevost.com

Golden Arrows Mardi Gras Indians
1:55 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Mardi Gras Indian
Big Chief Peppy leads the Golden Arrows. As a young man, he was a spyboy with the Creole Wild West, not to mention a flagboy with the Wild Magnolias. Given the Wild Magnolias association, expect the influence of Bo Dollis to be crystal clear.

CRITIC'S PICK

Galactic
2 p.m., Acura Stage
Funk
Galactic uses a funk and rock template to vamp on a chord or two while interjecting trance and hip-hop flourishes. They've gone all instrumental since parting ways with vocalist Theryl "The Houseman" DeClouet, but are happy to welcome guest vocalists to the Stage
from time to time. Look out for a new album from them soon. www.galacticfunk.com

Snooks Eaglin
2:10 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Blues
Some people call Snooks "The Human Jukebox" for the wide repertoire of songs he can call on while hunched over in a chair onStage
ripping out ridiculous guitar leads. Snooks also gets props for being Professor Longhair's favorite guitarist. In fact, his 1971 performance at Jazz Fest with Fess merits a mention in the upper echelon of Jazz Fest historical moments.

New Birth Brass Band
2:25 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Brass band
There are still a lot of New Orleans folks based in Houston, including New Birth. They're still holding down a couple of regular gigs there while also getting back into the New Orleans flow. The band is led by bass drummer "Tanio" Hingle, who keeps the beat simultaneously thick, quick and punchy. Young trumpet wunderkind Troy Andrews often appears with New Birth, and he's a featured guest on their George Porter Jr.-produced 2005 release, New Birth Family (Valley). www.newbirthbrass.com

Lighthouse Gospel Singers
2:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This venerable family group started out more than 50 years ago with a collection of siblings and cousins raising their voices in praise as a group. Currently a quartet, they return to Jazz Fest for their eighth appearance in the Gospel Tent
singing traditional songs backed by a four-piece band.

Leroy Jones & New Orleans Finest
2:30 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Contemporary Jazz
Leroy Jones came of age as a musician under the wing of Danny Barker. The trumpeter got his break playing with Harry Connick Jr.'s band, and Connick was subsequently kind enough to let Jones' band open for him when Jones was ready to go out on his own. Jones has recorded for Columbia Records and last November shared a Stage
with Wilco during a Katrina benefit in Chicago.

CRITIC'S PICK

Eddie Bo
2:50 p.m., Sheraton New OrleansFais Do-Do Stage
R&B
A recent in-studio appearance by Eddie Bo on Nick Spitzer's American Routes public radio program was highlighted by a remarkable and invigorating solo piano performance of "When the Saints Go Marching In." Bo's distinctive piano style is original while incorporating aspects of Art Tatum and Professor Longhair. "Check Your Bucket" and "Hook and Sling" are two essential Eddie Bo tracks that have made the world a better place. www.eddiebo.com

Jhelisa's Tribute to Nina Simone
2:50 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
Jhelisa is a vocalist with great versatility, equally at home singing jazz and rock. Evidence of the local jazz community's respect for her voice is represented by her work with bassist James Singleton. She's been doing sets focusing on Nina Simone's songbook for a few years years, so expect this set to be crisp and well thought out.

Chops Funky 7 Brass Band
3 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Brass Band
The brass band with the truly funky name performs.

The Electrifying Crown Seekers
3:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
These Fest favorites have been performing together since 1965. The Marrero-based quartet performs traditional spirituals to a driving beat, with a high voltage that their name gives lie to. Founding member James Williams and his wife augment traditional hymns with their own country and western-flavored originals.

Luther Kent & Trickbag
3:40 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Blues
Luther Kent has a powerful soul growl that can turn the paint on a barn from red to blue. Kent briefly fronted Blood, Sweat & Tears in the mid-1970s and his current band, Trickbag, is a large horn-fueled ensemble. His latest solo release is Down in New Orleans, but if you really want to hear Kent in fine form, check out his 2004 release with the Forever Fabulous Chickenhawks, called Deep in the Heart. www.lutherkent.com

the subdudes
3:40 p.m., Acura Stage
Roots Rock
The subdudes have a passionate core fanbase but their latest album, Behind the Levee (produced by Keb' Mo'), has vaulted them into the consciousness of more casual music consumers. This is due to critical praise from a cross-section of music writers and an extremely well-received recent tour. Reunited in 2002 after a five-year hiatus, the subdudes are a New Orleans band with music that is still relevant and moving forward. www.subdudes.com

Young Tuxedo Jazz Band
4 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
A band that can trace its lineage to 1910 must have a musical spirit that does something right. The current group is blessed to be under the stewardship of Dr. Michael White and Gregg Stafford. Their 2005 release, Jazz Continues, shows the group healthy and robust, especially on the traditional "What a Friend We Have in Jesus."

The Iguanas
4:05 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Roots Rock
The Iguanas dabble from organic music sources such as Chicano R&B, New Orleans jazz, jump blues and Tex-Mex rock. This doesn't make their sound derivative; rather, it's a fresh concoction that's made them a favorite on the roots rock circuit for close to 14 years. Their latest release, 2003's Plastic Silver 9 Volt Heart (Yep Roc), is considered one of their best, a mark of a mature band still with plenty of musical things to say. www.iguanas.com

CRITIC'S PICK

Herbie Hancock Quartet
4:10 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
The fingerprints of keyboardist Herbie Hancock are all over American jazz history from the 1960s to today. There's the early work with Miles Davis, the ground-breaking jazz-funk-rock fusion of the 1970s, the electronic music "Rockit" era of the 1980s and the all-star collaborations of recent years. No level of hyperbole is too over the top when describing Hancock's playing style or impact on musical styles. The January release, The Essential Herbie Hancock (Sony) is a career retrospective. www.herbiehancock.com

Hugh Masekela
4:15 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
African
Much like his former running partner Fela Kuti, Hugh Masekela uses his music as a political and social justice platform. The South African native was exiled for years in Botswana and England before returning to his homeland in 1990 following the release of Nelson Mandela from prison. His latest release is last year's Revival (Heads Up). www.ritmoartists.com/Hugh/Masekela.htm

Black Seminoles Mardi Gras Indians
4:25 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Mardi Gras Indian
The Mardi Gras Indian tribe performs.

CRITIC'S PICK

Franklin Avenue Baptist Church Choir
4:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This venerable choir was dealt a blow by Hurricane Katrina, when its main church building took on 8 feet of water. With satellite churches set up in Houston and Baton Rouge, though, evacuated parishioners have managed to maintain their community and their choir. This year's Gospel Tent
showing will be slightly reduced, but infused with the power of determination.

Dave Matthews Band
5:20 p.m., Acura Stage
Rock
A hero of millions and collaborator with Mystikal in the 2001 Jazz Fest Crowd Debacle, Dave Matthews' latest studio release is last year's Stand Up (RCA). "American Baby" is the single the record label pushed off of it. Another recent release is the live Weekend on the Rocks (RCA), and it wouldn't be surprising if DMB diehards enjoyed the live disc more than the new studio effort. www.davematthewsband.com

Etta James & the Roots Band
5:30 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
BluesEvery award that a blues-singing woman can possibly receive rests on Etta James' mantle. Two recent developments in James' world: she lost 200 pounds and just released All the Way (RCA) last month. The new album features the woman who cut the single "Tell Mama" in 1967 doing covers like Prince's "Purple Rain." www.etta-james.com

CRITIC'S PICK

Bill Summers with members of Los Hombres Calientes
5:40 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Contemporary Jazz
Summers is one of the world's foremost experts on African and Caribbean rhythm styles. He's been a prominent sideman for performers ranging from Herbie Hancock to Quincy Jones. Summers will have his full arsenal of percussion instruments and toys on hand for this set with some of Los Hombres compatriots. www.billsummers.net

Banu Gibson & New Orleans Hot Jazz with special guest Bob Havens
5:40 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Vocalist Banu Gibson has a vast understanding of jazz music from the early 20th century. Her performances are peppered with nods to standard bearers like Bessie Smith and the Boswell Sisters. This set should be all the sweeter with the inclusion of Bob Havens, the trombonist for 20 years on the Lawrence Welk Show. www.banugibson.com

C.J. Chenier & the Red Hot Louisiana Band
5:45 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Zydeco
C.J's father was Clifton, the one-time king of zydeco music. When Clifton died in 1987, he bequeathed the reins of the Red Hot Louisiana Band to his son. While C.J. still represents the progressive musical spirit of his father, he is currently performing more of a blues-based zydeco style. This is reflected on his recent CD, Desperate Kingdom of Love (World Village) é a collaboration wtih the Boston-based alt-blues group the Tarbox Ramblers.

CRITIC'S PICK

Darius Brooks and SDM
5:45 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
Internationally known gospel singer, songwriter and producer Brooks, a three-time Grammy winner, has worked with such heavy hitters in the field of spiritual song as evangelist Shirley Caesar, Ricky Dillard and Vicki Winans. His most recent CD, 2004's Chordant, was released earlier this year. He's joined here by Chicago's SDM choir, who appear on the album.

Terence Blanchard
5:55 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Modern Jazz
Trumpeter Terence Blanchard put out an album last summer, Flow (Blue Note), and it was one tasteful and colorful jazz document. Blanchard earned his rep and developed chops playing with Lionel Hampton and Art Blakey early in his career, and since has been involved in many projects held in high esteem in the jazz world. He's also an active composer collaborating with filmmaker Spike Lee including the recent Inside Man. www.terenceblanchard.com

Juvenile
6 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Rap
Juvenile grew up in the Magnolia housing project and was at the forefront of the bounce rap sound that came to national prominence in the late 1990s. The single "Back That Azz Up" was a certified mega hit explosion in 1998, and his 2004 collaboration with the late Soulja Slim ("Slow Motion") made it to No. 1 on the Billboard 100 chart. His recent release, Reality Check (Atlantic Records/UPT), features guests Ludacris, Fat Joe, Lil Jon, Houston rappers Mike Jones and Paul Wall, Eightball, and UTP mates Skip and Wacko, as well as the Katrina-inspired manifesto, "Get Ya Hustle On." www.delafont.com/music_acts/juvenile.htm


SUNDAY, APRIL 30

Los Vecinos
11:20 a.m., Acura Stage
Latin
The pulsating clave rhythms of Cuba flow from this New Orleans group fueled by bassist Andy Wolf. The lineup varies in size, borrowing from a mix of local musicians (at various times and in various sizes) that comprise this group that takes its name from the Spanish "the neighbors." Look for a range of Latin styles including conjunto and cumbia. Their most recent release is P'aqui P'alla.

Papa Grows Funk
11:25 a.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Funk
The band's name and its most recent release, Shakin', say it all about Hammond B-3 organ wiz John "Papa" Gros, who is one of New Orleans' hardest-working musicians, mining the Meters-inspired funk that he learned as a sideman for bassist George Porter Jr. & his Runnin' Pardners. Gros plays with a rare, aggressive passion that has made him a local favorite over the past five years.

The Revealers
11:30 a.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Reggae
In a city that curiously suffers from a paucity of quality reggae bands, the Revealers have been a standout for years, but haven't played it safe by sticking to just the roots music of reggae and the have incorporated second-line rhythms, hip-hop and even surf-guitar licks all with a dash of New Orleans funk. Their most recent effort, The Revealers é Live, mixes material from their previous two CDs é Can't Be Denied and Paradise é as well as new material. www.revealers.com

Leigh "Little Queenie" Harris
11:30 a.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
How fitting that Little Queenie é that firebrand vocalist who swings as hard as she rocks onStage
é would name her upcoming CD, Purple Heart. We can't wait for it! In the meantime, we can enjoy this former frontwoman for the Percolators contributing a reworking of her "My Darlin' New Orleans" for Nonesuch Records' excellent Katrina/Habitat for Humanity benefit compilation, Our New Orleans. (Expect that version on the new CD as well.) Check out her Web site for a hilarious anecdote involving a "reunion" run-in with Elvis Costello. www.littlequeenie.com

Kid Simmons' Local International All-Star Jazz Band
11:30 a.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
British trumpeter John "Kid" Simmons leads this popular traditional jazz outfit.

CRITIC'S PICK

Willis Prudhomme & Zydeco Express
11:30 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans/Fais Do Do Stage
Zydeco
"My little woman is a salty dog / My little woman don't wear no drawers / She put it up in the dresser drawer / Santa Claus said it's against the law," zydeco favorite Willis Prudhomme sings on his legendary tune, "Salty Dog," just one indication of his trademark rural wit and charm. The 75-year-old Kinder native and former farmer picked up the accordion 30 years ago with a little help from Cajun great Nathan Abshire and has blended the two genres ever since as evidenced by his 2000 Louisiana Red Hot release, Fais Do Do.

Jo "Cool" Davis
11:45 a.m., AIG/Gospel Tent
Gospel
A one-time Tipitina's doorman and MC, the imposing Davis, who's been singing gospel in New Orleans and around the country for more than a quarter century, often draws comparisons to Sam Cooke in the latter's Soul Stirrers days. Although complications from diabetes recently forced him to have his lower leg amputated, Davis still plans to stand tall and belt it out onStage
.

Paulin Brothers Brass Band
12:25 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Brass Band
The legacy of the great Doc Paulin lives on in his sons' brass band, which creates a melding of traditional and contemporary jazz into a new brass band sound.

John Mooney & Bluesiana
12:35 p.m., Acura Stage
Blues
He plays with all the fire of Son House and sings with the soul of Professor Longhairé his two mentors é and John Mooney's blues and New Orleans-inspired R&B sound clearly channels those influences. We just wish we could see and hear more of the fiery slide guitarist with the syncopated second-line rhythms and Delta blues chops who's most recent release was 2002's All I Want (Blind Pig). This kicks off what feels like a guitar-shedding doubleheader, as Mooney will be followed by Sonny Landreth. Yikes!

The Unstoppable Gospel Creators
12:35 p.m., AIG/Gospel Tent
Gospel
This group adds a cool, slightly secular twist to its songs of praise; rewriting popular R&B songs to turn its message into a spiritual one. The Creators also perform classic and traditional gospel music.

James Andrews
12:50 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Jazz/R&B
It's been eight years since former New Birth trumpeter James Andrews released his catchy solo CD, Satchmo of the Ghetto, which not only referenced his obvious influence but also kept him on pace with his contemporary and fellow brass-band alumnus, Rebirth's Kermit Ruffins. But then Andrews' career peaked while Ruffins continued to soar That's unfortunate considering the power of Andrews' onStage
presence, which channels his legendary family heritage that includes Jessie Hill. These days Andrews alternates between solo gigs and performing with another rising star: his brother, Troy Andrews, whose Orleans Avenue band keeps getting better.

CRITIC'S PICK

Christian Scott
12:55 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Contemporary Jazz
This Berklee School of Music graduate and rising trumpet star mines his family's rich musical heritage; he's the nephew of saxophonist Donald Harrison Jr., but he's primed now to establish his own jazz identity. He's set out to prove this with the March release of his debut CD, Rewind That (Concord). Here he marries his classically trained discipline with that distinct traditional New Orleans jazz sound. Keep an eye on him as he attempts to follow Irvin Mayfield as the Big Easy's next hot, young trumpeter ready for the national spotlight.

Don Vappie & the Creole Jazz Serenaders
12:55 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Is there a more charming performer than Don Vappie when he steps up to the microphone inside the shaded Economy Hall Tent
, strumming his banjo and joshing with the spillover crowd? We're stumped to provide the answer. Part educator, part entertainer, Vappie's a true New Orleans original who channels everyone from Louis Armstrong, King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton and (of course) Danny Barker. It's pure joy when he sings in Creole French, and last year's release, Swing Out (Vappielle Music Productions), proved his versatility.

D.L. Menard & the Louisiana Aces
12:55 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do Do Stage
Cajun
The inimitable 74-year-old Doris Leon Menard if famously referred to as "the Cajun Hank Williams," having met the late country legend back in 1951. But make no mistake about it; Menard has a style all his own. Few south Louisiana musicians embody the rich storytelling tradition of the culture, best expressed in his 1962 classic, "La Porte d'en Arri é re (The Back Door)". For a quick education on his music, check out his 1995 release, Cajun Memories (Swallow), which features his signature song.

Soul Rebels Brass Band
1 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Brass Band
When Cyrill Neville saw this New Orleans brass band open up for the Neville Brothers at Tipitinas in 1991, he told them they reminded him of the Bob Marley song, "Soul Rebels." The name stuck, and the Rebels, as they are called for short, have been playing their unique blend of traditional second line music and contemporary hip-hop ever since. As they like to say, they bring the block party to the Stage
.

Higher Dimensions of Praise
1:25 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This 12-voice ensemble, led by Craig Adams, is a favorite on the festival circuit.

Golden Star Hunters Mardi Gras Indians
1:50 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Mardi Gras Indian
With the dramatic passing last year of Allison "Tootie" Montana, Larry Bannock became the longest-ranking Mardi Gras Indian chief. Out of the Gert Town neighborhood, Bannock's Golden Star Hunters have roamed the Uptown neighborhood for 35 years, fusing funk, rhythm & blues and more. The 58-year-old Bannock can be seen in the excellent Mardi Gras documentary, Cutting Loose.

CRITIC'S PICK

Sonny Landreth
2 p.m., Acura Stage
Blues
Those who get to the Acura Stage
early for the John Mooney set will get an amazing comparison/contrast in guitarslinging by sticking around for Landreth, by now a south Louisiana slide-guitar legend. Once known as an incomparable sideman who performed alongside Clifton Chenier and John Hiatt, Landreth for years has established his own identity. He's taken that notion to another level with recent releases such as 2000's Levee Town, 2003's The Road We're On and last year's Grant Street (all on Sugar Hill) recorded at the popular Lafayette venue. www.sonnylandreth.com

Big Sam's Funky Nation
2:10 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Funk
No, he's not (we believe) named after the Big Sam character from Gone With the Wind and no, his 2003 debut release, Birth of a Nation, wasn't an homage to D.W. Griffith. But what we can say about trombonist and bandleader Sam Williams' musical ambitions seem as large as his name. On a day when the "Southern Comfort Blues Stage
" seems as ill-fitting as ever, Big Sam presents a funky nation that is more than a little ambitious: a hyper-stylized brass band that is therefore able to explore the ensemble possibilities of funk and more. The lineup has fluctuated post-K, but there's a guarantee of a moveable feast of funk. www.bigsamsfunkynation

Melody Clouds
2:15 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
GospelThis family group, formed in 1965 by the late Leo Jackson, performs a blend of original and traditional spiritual music. Currently, the lineup includes four Jacksons and four new additions. The group recorded the album Great Day in 2002.

Leah Chase with Wess "Warm Daddy" Anderson
2:25 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
When it comes to the Chase family, people always have faith in the perfect match, whether it's the matriarchal Leah Chase and her husband, Dooky, and their namesake restaurant or her daughter's collaborations with jazz musicians like Anderson. As spring heats up, Chase's cabaret style seems a suitable pairing for the "Warm Daddy's" warm alto saxophone, which graces both the Wynton Marsalis Septet and the Lincoln Jazz Center Orchestra.

Walter Payton & Gumbo Fil é
2:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Speaking of a "warm daddy," we'll be eternally grateful to Walter Payton for bringing the world his son, trumpeter Nicholas Payton. But don't forget the papa, who was an in-demand session bassist on R&B, jazz and rock records before focusing on his own musical identity more than a decade back. The elder Payton last year released two CDs, Snapbean on Red Top and Gumbo Fil é .

CRITIC'S PICK

Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys
2:25 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do Do Stage
Cajun
Simply stated, there is not a more versatile or dynamic Cajun ensemble in the world than Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys, who somehow are able to nudge (not push) the envelope of Cajun music without losing its essential heritage. Their October 2005 release, Dominos (Rounder) may have enjoyed the distinction of being the first Cajun "dual disc" recording (music on one side, DVD performance/documentary featurette on the other), but it also features original songs in their Creole French glory as well as nods to south Louisiana mainstays such as D.L. Menard, Dennis McGhee and Am é d é and Bois Sec Ardoin. It's a great follow-up to the 2003 Grammy-nominated Bon Reve. www.mamouplayboys.com

Walter "Wolfman" Washington & the Roadmasters
2:30
p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
FunkHe just might be the hardest-working man in New Orleans' show business. Who among you returned to the city shortly after the storm é hampered by trauma, curfews and shuttered live-music venues é only to find out that the Wolfman was howling somewhere? If the storm proved anything, it was an appreciation once again for live, local music, and there are few local musicians who perform with the kind of fire that Washington does. Now 63, Washington refuses to slow down; his fiery guitar may have fueled the songs of Lee Dorsey ("Ride Your Pony," anyone?) and Irma Thomas, but he's always looking to the future. www.walterwolfmanwashington.com

Pin Stripe Brass Band
3 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Brass Band
There are certain brass band tunes that stand out, that capture the flavor of a city to the point that é when heard through some weird, post-Katrina aural filter é it just resonates even more deeply. Such was the moment some of us felt while strolling down Clairborne Avenue on Fat Tuesday and hearing "I Ate Up the Apple Tree" blaring from a neutral ground stereo. Booties were shaking, umbrellas swaying, barbecue roasting, and all was right with the world again. The Pin Stripes put out Your Last Chance to Dance (Orleans) in 1995, but classics like that and other songs ("Higher and Higher") are filled with life and hope.

Greater Antioch Full Gospel Choir
3:15 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
The mass choir from this Irish Channel church has more than 75 members when its three gospel ministries come together. This is the fourth year for Greater Antioch at the Jazz Fest, where it will perform a mix of traditional, contemporary and urban gospel. It can perform a cappella, but more often it is accompanied by a full band. Greater Antioch is also one of the few gospel groups this year that is incorporating gospel rap.

CRITIC'S PICK

Allen Toussaint w/special guest Elvis Costello
3:35 p.m., Acura Stage
R&B
This is a pairing of two of the most extraordinarily versatile and talented songwriters and performers working today. In December, they recorded River in Reverse, slated for a June release, at Piety Street Studios with a band that included longtime Costello sidemen like pianist Steve Nieve and a crack New Orleans horn section assembled by Toussaint. The result is a beautifully achieved conversation that includes several obscure Toussaint tracks, the Katrina-inspired title track written by Costello, and collaborations like the spooky "Ascension Day," which has Costello singing new lyrics over a haunting minor-key variation on Toussaint's famous "Tipitina."

Rebirth Brass Band
3:35 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Brass Band
First, a mea culpa to our readers; the Count was a little ticked at his minions for not properly pumping up New Orleans filmmaker Charlie Brown's documentary Never a Dull Moment, which premiered last month. (Stay tuned for future screenings.) Regardless, the Rebirth is more than two decades old and still going strong despite having to struggle to return all of its members from their displacement post-K. The embodiment of the brass band revival, the Rebirth also funks firmly at the crossroads between old and new, bridging any generational gaps that may exist between the Dirty Dozen and upstarts such as the Soul Rebels or Coolbone. The Rebirth continues to tour relentlessly, so we're happy to have 'em back for the Fest. Let's hope they're back intact, at long last. www.rebirthbrassband.com

Gregg Stafford's Jazz Hounds
3:50 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Stafford's trumpet and fiery vocals are always a crowd-pleaser inside the Economy Hall Tent
. His musical pedigree is impeccable; he's related to legendary New Orleans trumpeter Henry "Red" Allen, and he grew up with a musical education that included Danny Barker's Fairview Baptist Church band as well as traditional brass bands.

CRITIC'S PICK

Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews, w/special guest Steve Turre
3:55 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Contemporary Jazz
Here's a little tip for the Troyster: Dude, you can play the trumpet like a mother. Ubiquitous though New Orleans musicians' nicknames may be, drop the "Trombone Shorty" moniker that's like a decade old and embrace your newfound talent as a trumpet player. On second thought, wait until after the Fest to ditch it, as you'll need all the street cred you can get in this little 'Bone summit that features one of the masters in former Jazz Messenger Steve Turre, who has been a longtime member of the Saturday Night Live house band.

Rosie Ledet & the Zydeco Playboys
3:55 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do Do Stage
Zydeco
"The Zydeco Sweetheart" last summer released her eighth album in 11 years, Pick It Up (Maison de Soul), where she once again shows how her single-row accordion playing has started to catch up with her sultry alto vocals. The Zydeco Playboys feature her husband and manager, Morris, on bass, along with her father, Lanice, on the rubboard and her nephew, Lukey, on drums. www.rosieledet.com

Yolanda Adams
4:05 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Gospel
You simply have to love Houston. Not only have the wonderful citizens of that city taken in our displaced brothers and sisters, but they have decided us to send over their crown jewel of gospel, Yolanda Adams. One of the true legends of contemporary gospel, Adams has gotten to this place by having the savvy to deftly blend R&B with the gospel sound. (Though traditionalists may have scoffed at the time, it helped move the genre forward.) Her 2005 release, Day By Day (Atlantic), her first in four years, features a number of guest stars: Mary Mary, Kirk Franklin and Donnie McClurkin. www.yolandaadams.org

The Mighty Chariots of Fire
4:15 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
This six-man group has been together since 1959, though none of the original members remain. Recently, they contributed a track, "99 and a Half Just Won't Do," to the New Orleans Social Club's post-Katrina collage of Crescent City sound, Sing Me Back Home.

Carrollton Hunters Mardi Gras Indians
4:25 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Big Chief Lionel Smith leads this Uptown tribe.

CRITIC'S PICK

The Meters
5:25 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Funk
You could argue that we don't deserve this, this second consecutive Jazz Fest appearance by the quintessential New Orleans funk group. They are, quite simply, Hammond B-3 organ wiz Art Neville, bassist George Porter Jr., guitarist Leo Nocentelli and drummer Zigaboo Modeliste. And they are responsible for redefining New Orleans music in the early 1970s and early '80s with such signature tunes as "Cissy Strut" (featuring Nocentelli's stinging licks and Neville's grooving keyboard), "Hey Pocky A-Way" (featuring Porter's driving bass lines) and "Just Kissed My Baby" (a full-on rhythmic modern miracle). Maybe we don't deserve all of this a second consecutive year, but one thing is sure: After all this city has been through, an hour or so lost in a funky trance surely is appreciated.

CRITIC'S PICK

Bruce Springsteen w/ the Seeger Sessions Band
5:30 p.m., Acura Stage
Folk
There is no doubt that this was the hands-down coup of the Jazz Fest programming, with the most important artist in rock 'n' roll over the past quarter century kicking off an unprecedented tour with the 17-member Seeger Sessions Band. What does that all mean? A wide-ranging exploration of American roots music that includes everything from church music to the circus and tavern music that formed an essential foundation to our culture. This performance, in announcing the upcoming release, We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions, honors the folk great Pete Seeger in singing a chapter of the American songbook that includes "Erie Canal," "Jesse James," "John Henry," "Shenandoah," "Froggie Went A-Courtin'," "Jacob's Ladder" and the title track. There was an inordinate amount of pressure placed on Festival organizers to come up with some kind of Farm Aid lineup, and while that didn't happen, this set is something to be proud of.

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers
5:35 p.m., BellSouth/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Jazz
He might well be New Orleans' greatest charmer, which goes a long way toward explaining why he's compared to Louis Armstrong (and not just cuz of the trumpet blowing). After a decade with the Rebirth, Ruffins has spent 14 years establishing his own unique identity, and his 2005 Basin Street Records reunion with the Rebirth, Throwback, brings Ruffins' career full circle. Tip: Get your seat early, for everyone knows that Ruffins' blending of the brass band, swing, funk and R&B traditions always packs the Tent
. www.basinstreetrecords.com/artists/kermit-ruffins.html

John Lee & The Heralds of Christ
5:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Gospel
John Lee and this 20-voice group have been together since 1978. With members from across New Orleans and the surrounding area, the Heralds of Christ sing all kinds of gospel. Lee, the director, sings lead on two songs as the soloist role is passed around the group.

Lil' Band O' Gold
5:30 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do Do Stage
R&B
Louisiana's one true supergroup features Cajun accordionist Steve Riley, swamp-pop legend and drummer/vocalist Warren Storm (remember 1958's "The Prisoner's Song"?), swamp-rocking guitarist C.C. Adcock, keyboardist David Egan, pedal-steel guitarist Richard Comeaux and bassist David Ranson. Their live shows have always been a trip through Louisiana music and a rocking good time. www.ritmoartists.com/LilBandOGold/lbog.htm

Preservation Hall Jazz Band
5:35 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
Traditional Jazz
Jazz Fest marks the reopening of the venerable French Quarter club, which had been shuttered since Hurricane Katrina, and its world-famous house band is once again ready to perform the great standards of New Orleans' amazing musical canon. Trumpeter John Brunious, drummer John Lastie Jr., trombonist Lucien Barbarin and bassist/owner Ben Jaffe lead this talented group, which performs all over the country. www.preservationhall.com

Kirk Joseph's Backyard Groove
5:35 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Funk
As a founding member of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, sousaphonist Kirk Joseph knows a little something about laying down a funky groove, but his Backyard Groove expands on that to incorporate more swinging jazz and Afro-Caribbean sounds.

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  • St. Claude Second Saturdays @ St. Claude Arts District
    2820 St. Claude Ave.

    • Second Saturday of every month
    • 4 going/interested

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