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Father Knows Best 

Steve and Marge Kraus pay homage to Steve's late father, builder David Kraus, with a lakefront home that remains true to his modern aesthetic

Styling by Kara Nelson

When Steve and Marge Kraus bought their modernist Lakeshore house in 1989, they didn't have to inspect every nook and cranny, research its builder or wonder aloud about its history. Steve, a physician, grew up in the house, which was designed by local architect Dow Oliver and constructed by his father, contractor David Kraus, in 1963. The couple was well acquainted with the house's meticulous detailing and craftsmanship. They had celebrated numerous milestones in their lives there — including their marriage — and they knew that they would respect the house's modern integrity just as Steve's parents had. "My father-in-law was a renaissance man," says Marge of her husband's late father. "He loved beautiful things and had a sense of flair. After he died and we bought the house from Steve's mother, I sensed his presence. I wanted my kids to know him through the house he built."

An innovative builder for the times, Kraus put the house together as if it were a commercial structure, using 200 pilings and steel-beam construction, and infused it with the kind of clean-lined modern bones and sleek, easy-to-maintain materials that typify mid-century modernism. Because he and his wife spent a lot of time in California and Las Vegas, elements of the mid-century modern vernacular common to those areas — sliding glass doors, swimming pools, Japanese gardens, flat roofs, split-level floor plans, extended eaves, glass, steel and wood paneling — influenced his work, a fact that's seldom lost on people who visit the house.

"My children's friends call it the Brady Bunch house," Marge says of her home, the living room of which especially resembles the iconic TV set thanks to its freestanding, riser-less staircase and cathedral ceiling.

Designing the Kraus family home in 1963 was actually a family affair. Steve, just 14 at the time, used cardboard from laundered shirts to help his father draw up the dimensions and curve of the staircase, which was fabricated in Chicago. His mother Joyce selected the furnishings, which included a Saarinen womb chair and a George Nelson platform bench. "She knew how to furnish a house like this," says Marge. "It was perfect for its time."

Despite the fact that in 1989 renewed interest in mid-century modern houses had not yet reached the fervor in New Orleans that it had in cities like Los Angeles, the Krauses knew what a gem they had. Working with architect Matthew Voelkel and designer Marie Taylor, who specializes in modernist interiors, they made some structural changes. They replaced the house's acoustic ceilings with sheetrock, traded the windows in the dining room for a wall of glass bricks and heightened the ceiling in the master bedroom with an illuminated cut-out — all of which were intended to freshen, open and lighten the space without taking away from the purity of its design. They also added a new, contemporary iron gate designed by Voelkel and relied on Taylor's expertise to furnish the house with a mix of modernist pieces. Beyond that, little else changed. Even the kitchen appliances were original and in perfect working order.

Two years ago, when the house suffered serious roof damage during Katrina and flooded with 3 feet of water in its aftermath, the task of renewing the house was a very different story. Few of the family's furnishings — including the Saarinen womb chair passed on by Steve's mother — survived. In fact, the entire first floor had to be gutted, and much of the second floor had to be repaired as well. Dazed by her family's — and her city's — losses, Marge, who teaches nursing at Louisiana State University, had no idea where to get a contractor who would pay the same kind of attention to the house that her father-in-law had until a bit of serendipity intervened. "I found my contractor at the hair salon," she muses, still amazed by the scenario. It was Marge's hairdresser who immediately put her in touch with contractor Nelson Clayton of Clayton Homes, who accomplished the job. "I don't think just any contractor could have pulled this off," says Marge, who was also smart enough to have kept the original house plans in a place where they didn't get damaged. "[Nelson] called it the special house," she says. "There was such attention to detail. When it was originally built, all of the walnut paneling had mitered corners. There wasn't a piece of trim in this house."

The Krauses chose to restore most of the house as close to its original state as possible. Marge found a resource to replace the walnut paneling; had the terrazzo floors — which withstood the floodwater — cleaned, resealed and polished; and had the bookshelves surrounding the fireplace in the den rebuilt according to her father-in-law's plans. But they also called on Voelkel, as they had years earlier, to help them renovate a few areas such as the kitchen and master bath, and on Taylor to help them furnish the space with a new assortment of modern pieces rather than an exact replication of what existed before the storm.

"Marie said, 'You can't put everything back the way you had it before the storm,'" says Marge. She and Taylor found much of the furniture for the redo during a four-day trip to New York and even got to visit the Manhattan apartment of internationally renowned furniture designer Vladimir Kagan in the process. What they didn't buy in New York, they purchased from modernist catalogs such as Design Within Reach and Room & Board and through local retailers like Ray Langley Interiors.

"Everybody wanted to put things back exactly like it was, as if you could recreate your life exactly as it was," says Taylor, pointing out the irony of the notion. "My point was we have a new opportunity here; let's do something different. That's been a theme for me since Katrina," she adds. "I agreed that they should restore a lot of the house as it was. They have a very special house made more special by the fact that Steve's parents built it. But it was also a time to do some things differently. Things do change dramatically in people's lives. Katrina just added to that."

As the population ages and people live longer, one of the changes that Taylor urges her clients to consider is the addition of at least one wheelchair accessible bathroom, which simply means the floor can't have different elevations and openings have to be wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair. Together, Marge and Taylor designed the new master bath, which is wheelchair accessible, to evoke the feeling of a Zen retreat by using a mix of natural and light-reflecting materials that includes river rocks, marble, wood and glass tiles. The same blonde wood and minimalist hardware used in the bathroom also are used in the kitchen, where they're combined with glossy, black countertops and new stainless steel appliances. There, Marge indulged her taste for saturated color. "A lot of modernist environments use a lot of white," says Taylor. "Marge uses a lot of color, and that makes her modernist environment unique."

Because the redesign of the kitchen follows its previous layout, the Krauses were able to keep its original terrazzo floor and reuse the same plumbing lines — decisions that not only saved money but also helped preserve the original character of the space and the legacy of the man who built it.

"This house has a lot of memories of my father," says Steve. "It was a labor of love for him, and all of the people who worked for him went out of their way to make sure it was special, too."

click to enlarge EUGENIA UHL
click to enlarge After the house flooded, Marge replaced the den's - original Saarinen womb chair, passed on by Steve's - mother, with a new one from Design Within Reach and - chose a green shag rug evocative of the era in which the - house was built. She found the dog sculpture at Jazz - Fest, which she and Taylor traditionally attend together - on opening day. The artist who created it restored it for - free after it was damaged by floodwater. - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • After the house flooded, Marge replaced the den's original Saarinen womb chair, passed on by Steve's mother, with a new one from Design Within Reach and chose a green shag rug evocative of the era in which the house was built. She found the dog sculpture at Jazz Fest, which she and Taylor traditionally attend together on opening day. The artist who created it restored it for free after it was damaged by floodwater.
click to enlarge Marge wanted the living room to feel like a cloud, so she - and Taylor gave it a seamless backdrop of white walls - and fluffy white wall-to-wall carpeting. Vladimir Kagan's - Back To Back sofa anchors the room, and George - Nelson's platform bench, a vintage piece from the '60s, is - used to display a colorful mix of art objects below Robert - Warrens' painting Heavenly Gate. - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • Marge wanted the living room to feel like a cloud, so she and Taylor gave it a seamless backdrop of white walls and fluffy white wall-to-wall carpeting. Vladimir Kagan's Back To Back sofa anchors the room, and George Nelson's platform bench, a vintage piece from the '60s, is used to display a colorful mix of art objects below Robert Warrens' painting Heavenly Gate.
click to enlarge Marge relied on the lighting in a local Starbuck's to help - her select the color for the kitchen, which she describes - as a cross between mustard and split pea green. "Since - they've done the market research for what colors should - be conducive to socializing and eating and drinking, I - took the color deck to Starbuck's and held them up," she - says. - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • Marge relied on the lighting in a local Starbuck's to help her select the color for the kitchen, which she describes as a cross between mustard and split pea green. "Since they've done the market research for what colors should be conducive to socializing and eating and drinking, I took the color deck to Starbuck's and held them up," she says.
click to enlarge A Japanese garden is hidden from pedestrian view by a - brick wall separating the house from the street. - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • A Japanese garden is hidden from pedestrian view by a brick wall separating the house from the street.
click to enlarge The Krauses saved the console and the base of the - Saarinen tulip table from their flooded home and topped - it with a new piece of high-gloss, black marble. The oval - shape of the table top and the high backs of the chairs - were chosen because the rooms sits at a lower level than - the surrounding spaces. "Point of view is really - important," says Taylor. "You look down at that room, so - shapes and proportions needed to be right." - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • The Krauses saved the console and the base of the Saarinen tulip table from their flooded home and topped it with a new piece of high-gloss, black marble. The oval shape of the table top and the high backs of the chairs were chosen because the rooms sits at a lower level than the surrounding spaces. "Point of view is really important," says Taylor. "You look down at that room, so shapes and proportions needed to be right."
click to enlarge Each piece of walnut paneling used to replace the - original paneling was numbered so that the natural - patterns of the wood would match up. Marge chose to - furnish the breakfast area with the same Dakota Jackson - chairs that had occupied the spot before the house - flooded. For the table, she chose a new marble top for a - base that had belonged to her mother-in-law. - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • Each piece of walnut paneling used to replace the original paneling was numbered so that the natural patterns of the wood would match up. Marge chose to furnish the breakfast area with the same Dakota Jackson chairs that had occupied the spot before the house flooded. For the table, she chose a new marble top for a base that had belonged to her mother-in-law.
click to enlarge Horizontal planes are emphasized on the exterior of the - house, which was built in 1963. The original gate was - replaced by a contemporary iron gate designed by - architect Matthew Voelkel in 1989. - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • Horizontal planes are emphasized on the exterior of the house, which was built in 1963. The original gate was replaced by a contemporary iron gate designed by architect Matthew Voelkel in 1989.
click to enlarge Marge Kraus in front of the riserless, semicircular staircase - in the home. At the age of 14, Steve Kraus helped his father - calculate its dimensions and curve. - EUGENIA UHL
  • Eugenia Uhl
  • Marge Kraus in front of the riserless, semicircular staircase in the home. At the age of 14, Steve Kraus helped his father calculate its dimensions and curve.
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