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Food News 

Free Ride
African-American students pursuing a college degree in food arts, hospitality management, folk arts or a related field may apply for a full ride to the seventh annual Southern Foodways Symposium to be held October 7-10 in Oxford, Miss. Each year the weekend&185;s lectures, discussions and meals center on a different theme -- in 2002 it was barbecue, last year it was the foodways of Appalachia, and this year participants will explore the intersections of food and race in the American South. Three scholarship winners will receive a pass to the symposium ($380 value), plus a $400 travel and lodging stipend (the symposium pass covers most meals). Interested students must submit a 250-word essay answering the following questions: How are our dining rituals imprinted by race? Why was the integration of lunch counters an early and important initiative of the civil rights movement? What will you gain from a three-day conference that focuses upon food and race relations? For more information on the symposium and to apply for the scholarship sponsored by Glory Foods, visit www.southernfoodways.com. Submit essays along with your name, phone number and email address to sfamail@olemiss.edu by Sept. 10. Winners will be notified by phone on Sept. 15. Call 662-816-2055 with questions.

Sweet Opening
Diana Chauvin, whose family owns Bangkok Cuisine, La Thai Cuisine and Panasia, opened Sweet Ginger (Omni Crescent Hotel, 228 Camp St., 571-7500) at the end of June in the CBD space formerly occupied by Benjarong (another of her family&185;s ventures). Chef Mimi came to Sweet Ginger from Bangkok Cuisine, where she had cooked under Chauvin&185;s Thai mother, Punnee Benjaray, for 10 years; her menu at Sweet Ginger comprises traditional Thai dishes, many of them vegetarian, and it borrows specialties from throughout the family&185;s restaurant empire. Sweet Ginger is open for lunch weekdays and dinner nightly.

Jam Sessions
The Jamlady Cookbook
(Pelican Publishing, $35) came across my desk last week, and with the summer's fruit harvests coming to close, its uses are too numerous to keep to myself. Beverly Schoonmaker, aka the Jamlady, includes dozens upon dozens of recipes and tips for making jellies, jams, preserves, jam-centric baked goods and fruit butters. There are more than 20 recipes involving peaches alone.

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