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The Best and the Worst of the Week 

Al Weddle Jr.,
known affectionately as "Doc" to his students at Jesuit High School, has won the Law-Related Educator of the Year Award for 2002 from the Law League of Louisiana, a division of the state bar association. The award recognizes exceptional social studies or business law teachers in elementary and secondary schools. In addition to his teaching duties, Weddle is an assistant city attorney in New Orleans.

Justin May,
a first-grade teacher at William J. Guste Elementary, has won Teach for America's highest honor, the Sue Lehmann Award for Excellence in Teaching. Teach for America, the corps of college grads who teach in underserved areas, chose May based on his initiative in starting an after-school science program and on the outstanding improvement shown by his students.

Crimestoppers, Inc.
has received the Federal Bureau of Investigation's annual Director's Award for Community Leadership. The nonprofit corporation in New Orleans was selected for the national honor because of its role in solving more than 5,400 crimes since its inception in 1982. Crimestoppers, which is run largely by volunteers, is the first local organization to win this award, according to the FBI.

The La. Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries
was ordered by a state judge to turn over public documents after it failed to comply with a citizen's public records request. Pat Todd Jr. of Natchitoches sued the agency after it did not provide him with the documents within 72 hours of his request, as mandated by state law. The records concerned a shooting involving the boat and truck of a Wildlife and Fisheries agent.

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