Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: Whiplash

Ken Korman on Damien Chazelle’s tale of an aspiring jazz drummer’s quest for immortality
What price greatness? That's the question at the heart of writer/director Damien Chazelle's Whiplash, the story of an aspiring jazz drummer named Andrew Neyman (Miles Teller) who must confront personal demons and an abusive mentor in his quest for musical immortality.

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: Laggies

Ken Korman says Keira Knightley is sweet and charming in Lynn Shelton’s film about a slacker
Known for low-budget and partially improvised indie films like Humpday and Your Sister's Sister, director Lynn Shelton takes careful steps toward the mainstream with the relatively polished Laggies. Shelton's film is funny and sweet and features a charming central performance from Keira Knightley, making Laggies a guilt-free romantic comedy for those left cold by Hollywood's output in the genre.

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: Interstellar

Ken Korman on Christopher Nolan’s latest film, with Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway
The films of British-American writer/director Christopher Nolan are nothing if not ambitious. From his early, strikingly complex amnesia tale Memento to his reinvention of superhero mythology through The Dark Knight trilogy, Nolan has constructed movies the way architects and engineers build skyscrapers — in the most thoughtful, methodical and fail-safe manner possible.

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: Listen Up Philip

Ken Korman says Jason Schwartzman is perfectly loathsome in Alex Ross Perry’s latest movie
Is it necessary that audiences identify in some way with the main character in a movie? Does a fictional protagonist have to be likable for a film to succeed?

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

Ken Korman finds a lot to like in the tale of a washed-up superhero movie star played by Michael Keaton
Any experienced filmmaker will tell you that movies are made in the editing room. Directors and cinematographers use a method known as "coverage" to get multiple shots and takes of individual scenes from a variety of angles and distances so even the most troublesome scene can be reimagined and assembled later from scratch.

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: Big Charity

Matt Brennan on the documentary about Charity Hospital, screening as part of the New Orleans Film Festival
Though it begins and ends as a sentimental journey through the Charity Hospital system, director Alexander John Glustrom's documentary Big Charity ultimately emerges as a work of advocacy against disaster capitalism. From the workaday heroism of those stranded at "Mama Charity" in the days following Hurricane Katrina to the construction of the new University Medical Center (UMC), the film argues that the oldest continuously operating hospital in the United States fell victim not to flooding but to politics.

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: St. Vincent

Ken Korman says the Bill Murray-Melissa McCarthy comedy succumbs to sticky sentimentality by the end
It's the easiest pitch in Hollywood: Bill Murray is a cantankerous codger with a hidden heart of gold. What self-respecting (and profit-hungry) film studio wouldn't give that movie the green light?

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: Fury

Ken Korman on Brad Pitt’s turn as a World War II Army sergeant
"Ideals are peaceful, history is violent" passes for profundity in the remarkably uncomplicated and old-fashioned World War II movie Fury. Playing a tank commander named Wardaddy, straight-faced Brad Pitt delivers the hokey line.

Film: Previews and Reviews

New Orleans Film Festival turns 25

Matt Brennan on the silver anniversary of the film fest
In a black-walled editing suite tucked away on the tenth floor of a building in the CBD, writer/producer Renee Henry and editor Anna Holley cue up a few minutes of blurry footage from a local news affiliate, circa April 1989.   "The New Orleans Film and Video Festival," the correspondent narrates.

Film: Previews and Reviews

2014 New Orleans Film Festival offerings

Reviews of Dear White People, Big Star: Live in Memphis, Zack and Addie and more
The New Orleans Film Festival screens nearly 250 movies in a variety of genres. It's also celebrating its 25th anniversary.

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: 20,000 Days on Earth

Ken Korman on a unique documentary starring Nick Cave
Most music documentaries are designed to reach the existing fan base for a particular artist or type of music. Modest ambitions often come with the territory, if only because it's difficult to convince general audiences to spend time and money on unfamiliar artists.

Film: Previews and Reviews

Review: As It Is In Heaven

LSU film professor Joshua Overbay's low-budget but quietly affecting As It Is In Heaven shows how much can be done with limited resources as long as all the crucial elements are in place. Shot in 17 days with a crew consisting almost entirely of film students while Overbay taught at Kentucky's Asbury University, the movie portrays the rise of a charismatic religious-cult leader and his power struggle with the son of the sect's original leader.

Film: Previews and Reviews

more Film: Previews and Reviews »

Recently Featured Film

Review: Laggies

Ken Korman says Keira Knightley is sweet and charming in Lynn Shelton’s film about a slacker

Review: Interstellar

Ken Korman on Christopher Nolan’s latest film, with Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway

Review: Listen Up Philip

Ken Korman says Jason Schwartzman is perfectly loathsome in Alex Ross Perry’s latest movie

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