NOPD

Thursday, February 16, 2017

"Adopt-a-Cop" returns for Mardi Gras season

Posted By on Thu, Feb 16, 2017 at 12:46 PM

CREATIVE COMMONS/BONNE BASILE
  • CREATIVE COMMONS/BONNE BASILE

The New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation (NOPJF) is once again asking the public to show appreciation for the men and women in law enforcement who work long hours to keep parade-goers safe.

The NOPJF’S annual “Adopt-A-Cop” program solicits donations, starting at $10, to provide meals, snacks and beverages to cops working the city’s parade routes. Businesses are encouraged to donate more by becoming sponsors. Donations can be made online at nopjf.org/adopt-a-cop. Other area law enforcement agencies that work with NOPD during Mardi Gras also benefit from the program.

Tags: , , , ,

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

"We’re called to serve the vulnerable": New Orleans responds to Trump's immigration order as refugee agencies face uncertain future

Posted By on Tue, Jan 31, 2017 at 7:00 PM

A protest outside City Hall Jan. 29 following a freeze on immigration and refugee entry. - KAT STROMQUIST
  • KAT STROMQUIST
  • A protest outside City Hall Jan. 29 following a freeze on immigration and refugee entry.

A family with three children under 5 years old was expected to arrive in Louisiana this week from Syria, where the death toll of a six-year-old civil war has reached nearly 500,000 people. The family is one of 80 refugee families Catholic Charities Archdiocese of New Orleans (CCANO) expected to resettle into Louisiana this year. Following an immigration ban targeting majority-Muslim countries and freezing a refugee program, CCANO is likely not to receive any refugee families for at least the next four months, leaving their safety and future in the U.S. unclear as constitutional questions, nationwide protests and lawsuits challenge an executive order issued within Donald Trump's first week as President.

"Even if they are in a safe location, a refugee camp, to wait two and a half years — they go through a long, rigorous vetting process before they come here — to get to this point where a few days before your departure they tell you, ‘You can’t leave,’ said CCANO's Division Director Martin Gutierrez. "Imagine how disheartening that would be."

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Monday, January 23, 2017

Landrieu calls for expanded surveillance, strict bar rules under citywide crime plan

Posted By on Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at 6:00 PM

surveillance-2-1540939.jpg

A sweeping surveillance plan calls for 200 cameras throughout several New Orleans neighborhoods, while New Orleans bars will have to close their doors (but not close for the night) at 3 a.m. as a network of law enforcement tightens pedestrian traffic. The rules are part of a citywide plan from Mayor Mitch Landrieu with the cooperation of the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD), Gov. John Bel Edwards, the Louisiana State Police (LSP), the FBI and members of the New Orleans City Council.

The $40 million plan adds surveillance cameras to 20 "hotspots" through the city to be monitored by NOPD, as well as license plate readers at more than 100 intersections, "remote sensing technology" to detect weapons, and bomb-sniffing K-9 units. Bourbon Street will be pedestrian-only for major events and will go permanently pedestrian-only when the city finalizes a traffic plan, likely within four to six months. Bourbon Street will also have more lighting.

"When you go on Bourbon Street, everything you do will be seen," Landrieu said at a press conference Jan. 23.  "Do I need to let that sink in?"

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , ,

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

"Things have got to get better": a memorial to New Orleans murder victims since 2007

Posted By on Wed, Jan 11, 2017 at 1:40 PM

Nakita Shavers, whose brother Dinerral Shavers was murdered in 2006, reads the names of murder victims at the Silence Is Violence 10-year anniversary outside City Hall Jan. 11.
  • Nakita Shavers, whose brother Dinerral Shavers was murdered in 2006, reads the names of murder victims at the Silence Is Violence 10-year anniversary outside City Hall Jan. 11.

On Jan. 11, 2007, hundreds of New Orleanians rallied outside City Hall following a violent 2006. That year, 162 people were killed, including band director and musician Dinerral Shavers, marking New Orleans with the highest per capita murder rate in the U.S. Shavers' death — and the Jan. 4, 2007 death of filmmaker and artist Helen Hill in her own home — sparked the group Silence Is Violence to campaign for peace and demand citywide protection from gun violence, especially in its most vulnerable neighborhoods.

Ten years later, following a violent 2016 in which 174 people were killed, a small crowd had gathered on the wet steps of City Hall to memorialize victims of violence from the last decade — not with a march, but with a solemn reading of the names of more than 2,000 people who have been killed in New Orleans since 2007. Family and friends of the victims — along with District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro and Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman — read the names of all of them, starting with Corey Hayes, 28, who was killed on New Year's Day 2007. Towering nearby was a sculpture by artist Mitchell Gaudet, an annual piece reflecting the previous year's murders with large pieces of broken glass representing each victim, and two revolvers mounted toward each other at its center.

"It's surreal to be here 10 years later," said Nakita Shavers, whose brother Dinerral was killed Dec. 28, 2006.

Deborah Reeder, whose son Chester Reeder III was killed near a Super Sunday parade in 2009, read the list of victims from that year. "It's difficult for me to read — my son is on this list, so bear with me," she said. "For all the names that will be read, I am sorry for our loss."

Continue reading »

Tags: ,

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Editorial: Jeff Landry is Louisiana's Barney Fife

Posted By on Tue, Jan 10, 2017 at 2:32 PM

Not Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry.
  • Not Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry.
In a classic episode of The Andy Griffith Show, Sheriff Andy Taylor leaves town for the day, turning law enforcement over to his hapless, preening deputy Barney Fife. When Andy returns, he finds Barney has arrested half the town on charges such as “unlawful assembly” (Aunt Bee gossiping with friends outside the courthouse) and expects praise for cracking down on crime in Mayberry.

Turns out Louisiana has its own Barney Fife — Attorney General Jeff Landry.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

When the NOPD was on the lookout for Santa Claus

Posted By on Wed, Dec 21, 2016 at 3:38 PM

This December 1973 issue of Our Beat*, the former New Orleans Police Department monthly newsletter, urged NOPD officers to be on the lookout for a rather drunk-and-disorderly-looking man going by the aliases "Saint Nick" and "Kris Kringle." Then-NOPD Superintendent Clarence Giarrusso urged anyone seeing this character to call the cops immediately.

The Louisiana Division of the City Archives shared this on the LOU/DIV Facebook page today...
COURTESY LOUISIANA DIVISION/CITY ARCHIVES
  • COURTESY LOUISIANA DIVISION/CITY ARCHIVES

* From the NOPD website:
Our Beat was the title given to the very first publication of the NOPD. The first issue - Vol. 1, No.1 - was issued on October 20, 1949. Our Beat was published monthly, serving as an internal newsletter for the department. It highlighted officer news including transfers, achievements and promotions, NOPD events and other happenings within the department. However, Our Beat ceased publication in the early 2000s, prior to Hurricane Katrina impacting the city.

Tags: ,

Friday, December 9, 2016

Jordan Flaherty on saviors, New Orleans, media and activism

Posted By on Fri, Dec 9, 2016 at 11:59 AM

hi-res_cover.jpg
Jordan Flaherty's latest book, No More Heroes: Grassroots Challenges to the Savior Mentality, draws in part from his career as a reporter and TV producer — work that has taken him to sites of grassroots struggle around the world, but it's anchored in his home, New Orleans.

Mixed in with the movement for indigenous self-determination in Black Mesa and sex workers contesting the police state in Arizona are multiple local stories. Flaherty gives us a front-row seat for the cautionary tale of FBI snitch Brandon Darby, one of two white bros who came here from Austin and rose to power through Common Ground, living out the savior complex by launching a career at immense cost to the people he claimed to be rescuing and representing. On a more positive note, Flaherty also tells the story of the New Teachers' Roundtable, a New Orleans collective founded by three former Teach for America participants to push back against TFA and the charter school movement — educational "reforms" which function as a profitable large-scale weaponization of the savior complex.

The crux of this wide-ranging book is finding alternatives to activism's savior mentality, that hero model in which a person of privilege uses their genius or other exceptional qualities to "rescue" the less fortunate.


I came to Flaherty's book with wariness, braced for scolding — but instead found No More Heroes to be full of love and compassion, including towards those who fall into the traps of saviordom. 


At 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, the Community Book Center (2523 Bayou Road.) will host one of a series of book release events Flaherty has organized across the South, previewed here by Kat Stromquist.


Flaherty advocates going from "How can I be the single best white anti-racist activist with the sharpest critique / most specialized language / busiest schedule?" to "How can we find ways to bring more and more people into social justice work, from lots of entry points, to grow vibrant mass movements?" To clarify the answers, I sat down with Flaherty to discuss his book, journalism and activism.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , ,

Friday, August 12, 2016

Interview: Robert Sterling Hecker, New Orleans Harbor Police Chief and first-time crime novelist

Posted By on Fri, Aug 12, 2016 at 8:29 AM

Robert Sterling Hecker.
  • Robert Sterling Hecker.

Some say “it’s never too late to follow your dreams,” but we all know how life has a way of beating down even the most modest ambitions. Goals are circumscribed by family obligations, the day-to-day slog of work, the banal repetition of doing laundry and cleaning the gutters. “I was born to do it” becomes “maybe someday” becomes “I just don’t have time.”

Well, that’s you (and me). Not so much for Robert Sterling Hecker, former Gambit New Orleanian of the Year, 49-year veteran of law enforcement and the author of The Accidental Vigilante, a hard-boiled crime thriller about a detective who stumbles into involvement in a series of murders and abductions when he’s promoted into the unit that handles child abuse crimes. (If that sounds short on intrigue, just wait until the detective uncovers a connection to the Russian mob.) Hecker, who currently serves as chief of the Harbor Police Department, has been waiting to write a novel since high school. He spent the past three years writing his fiction debut.

Hecker spoke with Gambit about being inspired by police work and being a first-time novelist at age 69. The following interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Alton Sterling peace vigil second line in New Orleans July 10

Posted By on Sun, Jul 10, 2016 at 12:27 PM

Alton Sterling
  • Alton Sterling

Alton Sterling Peace Vigil March and Second Line

Sunday, July 10, 2016 5-7pm

Today’s peace march and second line is being spearheaded by Charles ‘Action Jackson’, radio DJ for WWOZ radio and ‘second line ambassador’, to show support for the family of Alton Sterling, who was killed by Baton Rouge police officers. “I’m tired.”, says a weary sounding Jackson. “I am a young Black man, born and raised in 9th ward. Fo so much killing going on, nobody more on radio that has a voice than me. I have to use that voice to keep people calm, to work with the police.”

Jackson, who worked over 36 years in law enforcement, says he can relate to the stresses police officers are under. “They have to make split decisions.” But says the goal of today’s event is “to stop the killing, stop the violence. We come in peace. We want to help everyone stay calm.”

Continue reading »

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Sidney Torres updates crime app, announces new patrol cars and a 'war room'

Posted By on Thu, Jun 2, 2016 at 11:30 AM

Sidney Torres and one of the new French Quarter Task Force Smart cars. - CHERYL GERBER
  • CHERYL GERBER
  • Sidney Torres and one of the new French Quarter Task Force Smart cars.

Former garbage king and current crime-fighting real estate developer Sidney D. Torres IV announced a new fleet of vehicles and a "2.0" version of the French Quarter Task Force app he developed last year, described as the "Uber of policing" in the neighborhood.

Continue reading »

Tags: , ,

Submit an event Jump to date

Recent Comments

© 2017 Gambit
Powered by Foundation