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Monday, April 18, 2016

The New York Times (once again) pisses off New Orleans Twitter

Posted By on Mon, Apr 18, 2016 at 2:32 PM


click to enlarge Artist's conception of the corner of Magazine and Nashville Streets in the "Uptown" area of New Orleans.
  • Artist's conception of the corner of Magazine and Nashville Streets in the "Uptown" area of New Orleans.

The New York Times
loves writing about New Orleans, but the city doesn't always reciprocate the love — particularly when the writer isn't Campbell Robertson or Rick Bragg.

Whether provoked by Kalegate, a snotty dismissal of the Erin Rose's customers as dentally challenged, or a hitherto unknown faubourg of attractive young white people known as "Central City," New Orleans Twitter has been quick to snap back like an alligator, cher, when it feels our unique urban gumbo (aiiieeee!) has been dissed by the Gray Lady. 

So pity poor Florence Fabricant, who visited Kenton's recently and liked it:
A little piece of New York is thriving in New Orleans. Mani Dawes, below right, an owner of Tía Pol in Chelsea, and her husband, Sean Josephs, below left, who owns Maysville in the Flatiron district, have relocated their family to the Big Easy. Easier indeed: Ms. Dawes’s mother is there to help with babysitting. In a somewhat remote yet up-and-coming neighborhood west of the Garden District ...
The problem, as New Orleans Twitter was quick to point out, is that the corner of Magazine and Nashville streets is about as "remote" as the corner of East 86th Street and Third Avenue in Manhattan (and both intersections have a Whole Foods within a block or so). In fact, Magazine and Nashville's remote yet up-and-coming neighborhood already has a name, and it's not UpGarDist or MagNash. It's, well, Uptown.

When Gambit reviewed Kenton's in February, the most "remote" thing that food critic Helen Freund found was a deviled crab "worlds away from traditional versions" and some sneaky wood-fired oysters that "hide beneath a blanket of smoky breadcrumbs topped with slivers of pickled shallots and a wedge of lightly burned lemon."

And so the "remote yet up-and-coming neighborhood" known as Uptown launched a thousand tweets. (OK, a few dozen.)

Are the Northeast-bound New York Times writers out of touch? Are we just too sensitive? Is it all in fun? All of the above? Since William Safire has left the building, someone ask The Ethicist.

New Orleans tweets; you decide. 


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