David Naccari 
Member since Sep 3, 2015


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Re: “Will the removal of four Confederate-era monuments become Mitch Landrieu’s biggest legacy as mayor?

Get rid of Mitch - put the monuments back where they belong.

34 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by David Naccari on 05/22/2017 at 4:54 PM

Re: “Clancy DuBos: Now what for the Confederate monuments?

Dear Clancy:

Are you sure that the monuments and the ground upon which they are situated is city property? My reading of the petition suggested that that point is in dispute.

As I follow the case, Judge Barbier has yet to rule on the merits of this case - only that the plaintiffs are not entitled to the extraordinary remedy of a temporary restraining order or a preliminary injunction (preventing the city from removing the monuments pending litigation) because, based upon allegations of the city (that the monuments would not be harmed by their removal and placement in a warehouse) there would be no irreparable harm visited upon the plaintiffs because if the plaintiffs later prevailed in their petition, the monuments could be safely moved back to their original locations at a later date.

In my reading of reports in the news media, over and over again, I have seen reporters have a very difficult time in understanding and explaining to their readers that a ruling on a temporary restraining order or a preliminary injunction is not the same as a ruling on the merits of a case and does not end the litigation. Do you have that same problem or have you purposely slanted your reporting of the case to suit a political or readership agenda?

And now that we see that All Crane Rental of Louisiana (which apparently had some expertise in safely moving monuments) is not in fact helping to remove four of New Orleans’ historical monuments, as previously reported and stated in court documents, and the unfolding of facts and possibly faux facts revealed themselves in the City Council meeting this week, that it is highly doubtful that the city can remove and store the monuments for $170,000, the basis for the denial of injunctive relief becomes in doubt.

Sincerely,

David Naccari
Native New Orleanian

10 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by David Naccari on 02/04/2016 at 9:10 AM

Re: “Final public meeting on Confederate monuments ignites explosive debate

Re: New Orleans’ Monuments, the Nuisance Ordinance, and Political Correctness

It was a nuisance when I was the victim of attempted armed robbery. It was a nuisance when my cousin was carjacked at gunpoint. It was a nuisance when my elderly neighbor was bludgeoned to death with a hammer. It was a nuisance when my friend’s daughter was raped.

It was a nuisance when I taught at a middle school and was punched in the eye by a seventh grader receiving permanent injury to my retina.

It was a nuisance when I later taught at an elementary school, grades PreK - 5, where each year 2 - 4 teachers would be attacked by students and sent to the hospital or medical clinic, some with permanent injuries never to return to work again.

The list of violent crimes committed against myself, my friends, and neighbors goes on and on.

Our monuments didn’t commit 97% of the homicides in New Orleans. Our monuments didn’t give birth to 95 - 100% of children out of wedlock. Our monuments didn’t give New Orleans a homicide rate more than three times the national average. Our monuments didn’t turn our previously peaceful community into one of the murder capitals of the world.

If I could significantly reduce the murder rate without removing any monument, I would do it; and if I could significantly reduce the murder rate by removing all of the monuments, I would do it; and if I could significantly reduce the murder rate by removing some of the monuments and leaving others alone, I would also do that.

But we have yet to live in a nation where all people are judged by the content of their character, and so Dr. King’s dream remains unfulfilled.

So now our monuments are at risk, even though tens of millions have enjoyed and celebrated (“to Educate and Inspire Generations to Come”) the United Negro College Fund’s art collection “Great Kings and Queens of Africa” (many of whom owned slaves) which was prominently displayed at the United Nations, the Kennedy Center, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, and on Capitol Hill, and parts of which have been distributed to Xavier and Dillard Universities.

And even though each year numerous New Orleanians joyously dress in the garb of Native Americans at Mardi Gras although many Native Americans owned slaves and fought for the Confederacy.

And even though Frederick Douglass, father of the civil rights movement, reported that numerous African Americans fought in active combat roles for the Confederacy long before they were admitted into the ranks of the Union Army.

And even though part of our public space is used to honor the Buffalo Soldiers who helped the U. S. Army commit genocide against Native Americans in the American west.

Political correctness is a disease which pretends to solve problems and instead creates them. It appeases and placates to the lowest common denominator in our society. It thrives on racism and hatred while pretending to promote fairness and equality.

It loves to control through bureaucracy rather than by allowing a free people to arrive at meaningful solutions. It promotes divisiveness rather than unity. It fosters ignorance rather than knowledge. It is quick to criticize but unwilling to accept responsibility.

It is political correctness that prevents teachers from removing disruptive and violent students from their classrooms and hence dooms children of poverty to an inferior education.

It is political correctness that deprives at risk children of the supervision of a caring, responsible father by financially subsidizing multiple births out of wedlock, generation after generation, which common sense dictates directly contributes to New Orleans’ appalling crime rate.

It is political correctness that intimidates and silences meaningful dissent and constructive criticism when only through the give and take of engaged discussion can we solve our problems and resolve our differences.

It is time for New Orleanians to unite by values rather than be divided by race - to reject the false prophet of political correctness and see it for what it really is - an ideology that pretends to liberate but in fact enslaves. Only then can we and all Americans be free at last, free at last, thank God almighty, free at last!

Sincerely,

David Naccari
Native New Orleanian

24 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by David Naccari on 12/11/2015 at 9:47 AM

Re: “New Orleans church leaders call for Confederate monument removal

Re: Our Monuments, the Nuisance Ordinance, and Political Correctness

It was a nuisance when I was the victim of attempted armed robbery. It was a nuisance when my cousin was carjacked at gunpoint. It was a nuisance when my elderly neighbor was murdered.

It was a nuisance when I taught at a middle school and was punched in the eye by a seventh grader receiving permanent injury to my retina.

It was a nuisance when I later taught at an elementary school, grades PreK - 5, where each year 2 - 4 teachers would be attacked by students and sent to the hospital or medical clinic, some with permanent injuries never to return to work again.

The list of violent crimes committed against myself, my friends, and acquaintances goes on and on.

Our monuments didn’t commit 97% of the homicides in New Orleans. Our monuments didn’t give birth to 95 - 100% of children out of wedlock. Our monuments didn’t give New Orleans a homicide rate more than three times the national average for a comparably sized American city. Our monuments didn’t turn our previously peaceful community into one of the murder capitals of the world.

If I could significantly reduce the murder rate without removing any monument, I would do it; and if I could significantly reduce the murder rate by removing all of the monuments, I would do it; and if I could significantly reduce the murder rate by removing some of the monuments and leaving others alone, I would also do that.

But we have yet to live in a nation where all people are judged by the content of their character, and so his dream remains unfulfilled.

So now our monuments are at risk, even though millions have enjoyed and celebrated the United Negro College Fund’s art collection “Great Kings and Queens of Africa” many of whom owned slaves, parts of which have been distributed to Xavier and Dillard Universities; and even though each year numerous New Orleanians joyously dress in the garb of Native Americans at Mardi Gras although many Native Americans owned slaves and fought for the Confederacy.

Political correctness is a disease which pretends to solve problems and instead creates them. It appeases and placates to the lowest common denominator in our society. It thrives on racism and hatred while pretending to promote fairness and equality.

It loves to control through bureaucracy rather than by allowing a free people to arrive at meaningful solutions. It promotes divisiveness rather than unity. It fosters ignorance rather than knowledge. It is quick to criticize but unwilling to accept responsibility.

It is political correctness that prevents teachers from removing disruptive and violent students from their classrooms and hence dooms children of poverty to an inferior education.

It is political correctness that deprives at risk children of the supervision of a caring, responsible father by financially subsidizing births out of wedlock, which common sense dictates directly contributes to New Orleans appalling murder rate.

It is political correctness that intimidates and silences meaningful dissent and constructive criticism when only through the give and take of engaged discussion can we solve our problems and resolve our differences.

It is time for New Orleanians to unite by values rather than be divided by race - to reject the false prophet of political correctness and see it for what it really is - an ideology that pretends to liberate but in fact enslaves Only then can we and all Americans be free at last, free at last, thank God almighty, free at last.

Sincerely,

David Naccari
Native New Orleanian

2 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by David Naccari on 09/03/2015 at 6:18 AM

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