Pin It
Favorite

Vote secrecy aimed at next gov, not Jindal 

Secret ballot to elect next Senate leader

  The Louisiana Senate's decision last week to elect its future leader via secret ballot was initially reported by NOLA.com as a slap at Gov. Bobby Jindal, who like most Louisiana governors used a heavy hand in the selection of House and Senate leaders. However, given the fact that the new rule won't take effect until January, the change actually affects the next governor more than Jindal, who will be gone by then.

  Several state senators confirmed that the decision will boost the chances of current Senate President John Alario holding on to his job despite potential pressure from the next governor to replace him. Alario is extremely popular among his Senate colleagues and historically protects the flank of whoever is governor, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the next governor will want to keep him as Senate president.

  A secret ballot in the election of Senate president thus gives Alario an edge if he seeks to keep the job. If the governor can't tell who voted for whom, he might be less inclined to try to topple Alario — and he presumably won't be able to retaliate against senators who don't vote for his favored candidate, if he does try to depose the current Senate president.

  The vote in the 39-member Senate to change the rule was 34-4. Alario, as presiding officer, did not vote.

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

Pin It
Favorite
Submit an event Jump to date

More by Clancy DuBos

© 2017 Gambit
Powered by Foundation